Week 5: Health Disparities

General Poverty

1. Play Spent Activity:

The Urban Ministries of Durham have a great online poverty simulation that goes through a month in the life of a person living in poverty. To access the simulation, click this link: http://playspent.org/   Summarize your experience with this simulation activity

Did you have money left over?

What difficult decisions did you need to make?

What was your overall feeling when the month was over?

2. After reading the Culture of Care Policy Brief 

What does the Covid-19 pandemic teach us about health disparities in the U.S?

Identify policy recommendations that would address these inequalities.

Food Security

Go to the website, United States Food Drug Administration- Household Food     

Security at

http://www.ers.usda.gov/topics/food-nutrition-assistance/food-security-in-the-us.aspx

How is food insecurity defined?

Which populations are most at risk for food insecurity?

What programs are available to improve food access? Consider Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)

Homelessness

1. Who are the homeless and why are they homeless?

Go to the website of the National Coalition for the Homeless:  

https://nationalhomeless.org/about-homelessness/

Click on Issues – Read about 2 topics that interest you.

Click on Campaigns – read about one campaign.

Hoover over About NCH and then click on Policy Priorities – read about one policy recommendation.

2. Describe the face of the “homeless”.

What are the numbers?

Who is homeless?

Why are they homeless?

How are health and homelessness related?

Identify and describe one policy project to reduce/end homelessness.

Go to Policy Map in the MSU library database. What information can you find on housing and homelessness in your community? As a public health nurse, why is it important to know this information?

3. Describe what is meant by having “affordable housing”
Review the Mortgage Lending Report at the following link: https://ncrc.org/ncrc-2020-home-mortgage-report-examining-shifts-during-covid/?mc_cid=fdf4610bd7&mc_eid=cbd7cf5abd
Based on your review, how do current trends in mortgage lending impact affordable housing and homelessness?
What populations are most likely to have challenges with mortgage lending, and why?
What similarities do you see in populations most impacted by homelessness and mortgage lending?
What recommendation would you give to a potential home buyer who may be most impacted by current trends in mortgage lending?

culture of health

with support from:

www.healthaffairs.org/briefs

health policy brief  june 2021

Work plays a key role in moderating the COVID-19 pandemic experiences
of Americans and in imposing economic and social costs on households.

Frontline workers, many of whom are considered “essential,” face dispropor-
tionate health risks as they weather the pandemic. At the same time, many
white-collar workers have transitioned to remote work, often while simul-
taneously caring for dependent children, leading to severe role strain and
work-life conflicts.

The often-dire consequences of the pandemic are stratified along race, gender,
class, and occupational lines. In this brief we explore how existing inequalities
at work across these same categories perpetuate inequalities in the toll of
COVID-19. Before the pandemic, many of those currently working in frontline
positions faced low wages, few benefits, and erratic schedules. (Note: All linked
references in this brief are also listed in supplemental exhibit 1.)

Many of these issues have only intensified during the COVID-19 pandemic.
We highlight the importance of—and inequalities in—on-the-job conditions
that affect viral exposure risk and fringe benefits such as paid sick leave and
the ability to work from home that allow workers to manage risk. We also
propose policy recommendations to lessen these inequalities during the
pandemic and for the service sector moving forward. We do not recommend
a return to prepandemic standards but, instead, a movement toward a better
and more equitable future for employees.

The COVID-19 pandemic has laid bare existing
inequalities in workplace exposure to
health risks and economic insecurity. Policy
action is needed to protect workers’ health
during the pandemic and to support worker
empowerment and equitable opportunities in
the future.

INEQUALITIES AT WORK AND THE
TOLL OF COVID-19

Key Points
» Workplaces shape risk for exposure to

COVID-19 through on-site safety practices,
including the provision and required use of
personal protective equipment, as well as
protective policies such as paid sick leave and
the flexibility to work from home.

» More than one in every five US workers has
no paid sick leave. Recent expansions of paid
sick leave coverage still exclude many workers.
Low-wage workers are far more likely than their
higher-paid counterparts to lack paid sick leave
but are the least able to afford to take unpaid
time off from work when ill.

» Women, people of color, and those of lower
socioeconomic status are the most likely
among all workers to hold frontline positions
that require in-person work and the least
likely to have paid sick leave. These groups
have disproportionately experienced the
negative health and economic consequences of
COVID-19.

» Women hav

culture of health

with support from:

www.healthaffairs.org/briefs

health policy brief  june 2021

Work plays a key role in moderating the COVID-19 pandemic experiences
of Americans and in imposing economic and social costs on households.

Frontline workers, many of whom are considered “essential,” face dispropor-
tionate health risks as they weather the pandemic. At the same time, many
white-collar workers have transitioned to remote work, often while simul-
taneously caring for dependent children, leading to severe role strain and
work-life conflicts.

The often-dire consequences of the pandemic are stratified along race, gender,
class, and occupational lines. In this brief we explore how existing inequalities
at work across these same categories perpetuate inequalities in the toll of
COVID-19. Before the pandemic, many of those currently working in frontline
positions faced low wages, few benefits, and erratic schedules. (Note: All linked
references in this brief are also listed in supplemental exhibit 1.)

Many of these issues have only intensified during the COVID-19 pandemic.
We highlight the importance of—and inequalities in—on-the-job conditions
that affect viral exposure risk and fringe benefits such as paid sick leave and
the ability to work from home that allow workers to manage risk. We also
propose policy recommendations to lessen these inequalities during the
pandemic and for the service sector moving forward. We do not recommend
a return to prepandemic standards but, instead, a movement toward a better
and more equitable future for employees.

The COVID-19 pandemic has laid bare existing
inequalities in workplace exposure to
health risks and economic insecurity. Policy
action is needed to protect workers’ health
during the pandemic and to support worker
empowerment and equitable opportunities in
the future.

INEQUALITIES AT WORK AND THE
TOLL OF COVID-19

Key Points
» Workplaces shape risk for exposure to

COVID-19 through on-site safety practices,
including the provision and required use of
personal protective equipment, as well as
protective policies such as paid sick leave and
the flexibility to work from home.

» More than one in every five US workers has
no paid sick leave. Recent expansions of paid
sick leave coverage still exclude many workers.
Low-wage workers are far more likely than their
higher-paid counterparts to lack paid sick leave
but are the least able to afford to take unpaid
time off from work when ill.

» Women, people of color, and those of lower
socioeconomic status are the most likely
among all workers to hold frontline positions
that require in-person work and the least
likely to have paid sick leave. These groups
have disproportionately experienced the
negative health and economic consequences of
COVID-19.

» Women hav