I need help with finding resources for my small research paper on Ebola virus

Assignment Criteria

Points

%

Description

Introduction of disease

20

20%

Provide a brief description of the disease/disorder. This part of the paper should not be limited to the definition of the disease. Include epidemiology as appropriate.

Etiology

20

20%

Identify common causes and risk factors for the disease, to include age, gender, environmental, genetic, and lifestyle.

Pathophysiological processes

20

20%

Describe how the disease begins by describing the cause and mechanisms of the disease that give rise to signs and symptoms. Remember pathophysiology should be on a cellular level. Include information on how the body attempts to overcome/correct the disease, if applicable.

Clinical Manifestations & Complications

20

20%

Describe the physical signs and symptoms that are important in considering the presence of the disease.

Diagnostics

10

10%

Describe common laboratory and diagnostic tests used to determine the presence of the disease. Provide information on significant findings for these diagnostic studies associated with the disease.

APA Style and Organization

10

10%

The assignment should be a 2-3 page (excluding title and reference pages) typed paper and presented in APA format. This includes an APA title, page and references with in-text citations. Spelling and grammar will be evaluated with this assignment.

Must include at least two (2) scholarly, primary sources from the last 5 years, excluding the textbook.

Total

100

100%

1) Write a 2-3 page paper (excluding title and reference pages). Include the following information (also outlined in the grading rubric) about the selected disease process:

a. Introduction of disease

b. Etiology and risk factors

c. Pathophysiological processes

d. Clinical Manifestations & Complications

e. Diagnostics

2) Provide a reference list in APA format.

a. A minimum of two (2) scholarly, primary sources are required.

b. Given the nature of the research, current literature (within 5 years).

Introduction of disease (20)

Provides a one-

Running head: EBOLA 1

Ebola

Student Name

Institution

Class Info

Month/Year

Ebola

Introduction of Disease

Suicide at any age is tragic and, in my opinion, xxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Etiology

The elderly are an xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx. According to Kumar, Anish, & George, this group is the fastest growing xxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxx xxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx xxxl though it varies xxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxx100,000 individuals (Kumar, Anish, & George, 2015).

Pathophysiological Processes

Pychologically, xxx xxxxxx xxxxxx older (Kumar et al., 2015).

Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx natural causes (Shah & Zarate-Escudero, 2017).

One reason for these xxxx xxxxx x xxxxxx x xxxx of depression (Wijngaarden, Leget & Goossensen, 2015).

Clinical Manifestations & Complications

It just makes sssssssssssssssssssssssss ssssssssssssssssssss derease isolation, screen for depression and result in treatment when needed (Shah, et al., 2017). Education of primary caregivers is key. Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.

Diagnostics

Suicide isn’t a new……………. …………………… ………….concept to me and I XXXXXXXXX XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX.

References

Kumar, P. N., Anish, P. K., & George, B. (2015). groups, Risk factors for suicide in elderly in comparison to younger age groups. Indian Journal of Psychiatry, 249-254. Retrieved from
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4623642/

Mental Health. (n.d.). Retrieved from
https://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/leading-health-

indicators/2020-lhi-topics/Mental-Health.

Shah, A. & Zarate-Escudero, S. (2017). Elderly Suicide and Suicide Prevention. Mental Health and Illness of the Elderly, 1-36.

Wijngaarden, E., Leget, C. & Goossensen, A. (2015). Ready to give up on life: The lived experience of elderly people who feel life is completed and no longer worth living. Social Science & Medicine,, 257-264. Retrieved from
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277953615002889

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Available online at www.sciencedirect.com

ScienceDirect

Human transmission of Ebola vi

rus
Philip Lawrence1,2, Nicolas Danet1, Olivier Reynard1,
Valentina Volchkova1 and Viktor Volchkov1

Ever since the first recognised outbreak of Ebolavirus in 1976,

retrospective epidemiological analyses and extensive studies

with animal models have given us insight into the nature of the

pathology and transmission mechanisms of this virus. In this

review focusing on Ebolavirus, we present an outline of our

current understanding of filovirus human-to-human

transmission and of our knowledge concerning the molecular

basis of viral transmission and potential for adaptation, with

particular focus on what we have learnt from the 2014 outbreak

in West Africa. We identify knowledge gaps relating to

transmission and pathogenicity mechanisms, molecular

adaptation and filovirus ecology.

Addresses
1 Molecular Basis of Viral Pathogenicity, International Centre for

Research in Infectiology (CIRI), INSERM U1111 – CNRS UMR5308,

Université Lyon 1, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Lyon 69007,

France
2 Université de Lyon, UMRS 449, Laboratoire de Biologie Générale,

Université Catholique de Lyon – EPHE, Lyon 69288, France

Corresponding author: Volchkov, Viktor ([email protected])

Current Opinion in Virology 2017, 22:51–58

This review comes from a themed issue on Emerging viruses:

intraspecies transmission

Edited by Ron A.M Fouchier and Lin-Fa Wang

For a complete overview see the Issue and the Editorial

Available online 22nd December 2016

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coviro.2016.11.013

1879-6257/# 2016 Published by Elsevier B.V.

Introduction
Filoviruses are enveloped, non-segmented, negative-
strand RNA viruses, composed of three genera: Ebola-
virus, Marburgvirus and Cuevavirus (Figure 1) [1–3]. Ebo-
lavirus and Marburgvirus are together the causative agents
of severe disease in human and non-human primates
(NHPs) displaying fatality rates reaching 90% [1]
(Table 1). There are currently five known, genetically
distinct species of Ebolavirus — Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV),
Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV), Taı̈ Forest ebolavirus (TAFV),
Bundibugyo ebolavirus (BDBV) and the Asian filovirus;
Reston ebolavirus (RESTV) [2]. Almost all human cases
are due to the emergence or re-emergence of EBOV in
Gabon, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of

www.sciencedirect.com

Congo (DRC), and most recently in West Africa [4], and
of SUDV in Sudan and Uganda [5] (Table 1).

The increase in the number of outbreaks of Ebola virus
disease (EVD) in Africa since 2000 (Table 1) has b

Ebola Virus Disease: An Update On Current Prevention and
Management Strategies

MSF Field
Research

Authors Trad, MA; Naughton, W; Yeung, A; Mazlin, L; O’sullivan,
M; Gilroy, N; Fisher, DA; Stuart, RL

Citation Ebola Virus Disease: An Update On Current Prevention
and Management Strategies. 2016, 86:5-13 J. Clin. Virol.

DOI 10.1016/j.jcv.2016.11.005

Publisher Elsevier

Journal Journal of Clinical Virology: The Official Publication of
the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology

Rights Archived with thanks to Journal of Clinical Virology : The
Official Publication of the Pan American Society for
Clinical Virology

Downloaded 18-May-2018 15:58:06

Link to item http://hdl.handle.net/10144/618818

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Journal of Clinical Virology 86 (2017) 5–13

Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

Journal of Clinical Virology

j o u r n a l h o m e p a g e : w w w . e l s e v i e r . c o m / l o c a t e / j c v

bola virus disease: An update on current prevention and
anagement strategies

.A. Trad a,b,c,∗, W. Naughton g, A. Yeung g, L. Mazlin d, M. O’sullivan i,j, N. Gilroy i,
.A. Fisher e,f, R.L. Stuart g,h

Department of Infectious Diseases, Wollongong Hospital, Wollongong, NSW, Australia
Graduate School of Medicine, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, Australia
Medecins Sans Frontieres, Paris, France
Medecins Sans Frontieres, Brussels, Belgium
Division of Infectious Diseases, University Medicine Cluster, National University Hospital, Singapore
Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore
Department of Infectious Diseases, Monash Health, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
Department of Medicine, Monash University, Victoria, Australia
Centre for Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, Pathology West, Westmead Hospital, NSW, Australia
Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia

r t i c l e i n f o

rticle history:
eceived 11 June 2016
eceived in revised form 6 October 2016
ccepted 8 November 2016

a b s t r a c t

Ebola virus disease (EVD) is characterised by systemic viral replication, immuno-suppression, abnormal
inflammatory responses, large volume fluid and electrolyte losses, and high mortality in under-resourced
settings. There are various therapeutic strategies targeting EVD including vaccines utilizing different
antigen delivery methods, antibody-based therapies and antiviral drugs. These therapies remain experi-

eywords:
bola
anagement

accines
herapeutics

ment