How Healthy is Your Community?

The expression “Think Globally, Act Locally” guides your Discussion this week. By accessing information from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, you will have the opportunity to learn how healthy your community is. You will identify the key health issues and vulnerable populations in your own county. Understanding the factors that influence the health status of residents in your county will provide you with a local perspective to compare to global health challenges you will examine in weeks to come.

To prepare for this Discussion, first learn a little about the health statistics for your county. If you are not located in the U.S., pick a state and county you might like to visit or know more about to complete this assignment. Go to the Community Health Status Indicators Report, and select your state and county to review your local report.
http://wwwn.cdc.gov/CommunityHealth/homepage.aspx?j=1

Then, go to the Walden Library and find at least one recent (within last 5 years) article in addition to your Learning Resources to document, and support, the concepts you include in your Discussion post. For suggestions to help with your search, visit the Library http://library.waldenu.edu/908.htm

By Day 4, post a comprehensive response to the following:

Using the information available on the Community Health Status Indicators Report, provide a summary of the following information in your county. Use the article(s) you located, as well as your Learning Resources, to support your answers to the following questions in your post:

1. Identify your county and state.
2. How healthy is your county? What evidence did you use to come to your conclusion?
3. What vulnerable populations are identified in your county? Are there groups of individuals who have health disparities? Are there issues related to access to care within your county? If so, what are they?
4. Highlight the risk factors for premature death and environmental health concerns seen in you county.
5. Where does your county excel or fall behind in preventive health? Provide examples.
 

Resources for files below:

https://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dch/programs/healthycommunitiesprogram/tools/pdf/SDOH-workbook.pdf

https://class.waldenu.edu/bbcswebdav/institution/USW1/201830_05/BS_HLST/HLTH_3115_WC/artifacts/USW1_HLTH_3115_Week2-WHO_Social_Determinants_health_exec_summary.pdf

Resources:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2137064/

https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/adult.html

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/

Promoting Health Equity
A Resource to Help Communities Address

Social Determinants of Health

Cover art is based on original art by Chris Ree developed for the Literacy for Environmental Justice/Youth
Envision Good Neighbor program, which addresses links between food security and the activities of

transnational tobacco companies in low-income communities and communities of color in San Francisco. In
partnership with city government, community-based organizations, and others, Good Neighbor provides
incentives to inner-city retailers to increase their stocks of fresh and nutritious foods and to reduce tobacco

and alcohol advertising in their stores (see Case Study # 6 on page 24. Adapted and used with permission.).

Promoting Health Equity
A Resource to Help Communities Address

Social Determinants of Health

Laura K. Brennan Ramirez, PhD, MPH
Transtria L.L.C.

Elizabeth A. Baker, PhD, MPH
Saint Louis University School of Public Health

Marilyn Metzler, RN
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

This document is published in partnership
with the Social Determinants of Health

Work Group at the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of

Health and Human Services.

1

Suggested Citation
Brennan Ramirez LK, Baker EA, Metzler M. Promoting Health Equity: A Resource
to Help Communities Address Social Determinants of Health. Atlanta: U.S.
Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention; 2008.

For More Information
E-mail: ccdinf[email protected].
Mail: Community Health and Program Services Branch

Division of Adult and Community Health
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
4770 Buford Highway, Mail Stop K–30
Atlanta, GA 30041

E-mail: laur[email protected]
Mail: Laura Brennan Ramirez, Transtria L.L.C.

6514 Lansdowne Avenue
Saint Louis, MO 63109

Online: This publication is available at
http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dach/chaps

and http://www.transtria.com.

Acknowledgements
The authors would like to thank the following people for their valuable contributions to
the publication of this resource: the workshop participants (listed on page 5), Lynda
Andersen, Ellen Barnidge, Adam Be

Closing
the gap
in a
generation
Health equity through action on
the social determinants of health

Commission on Social Determinants of Health FINAL REPORT | EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

© World Health Organization 2008

All rights reserved. Publications of the World
Health Organization can be obtained from
WHO Press, World Health Organization, 20
Avenue Appia, 1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland
(tel: +41 22 791 3264; fax: +41 22 791
4857; e-mail: [email protected]). Requests
for permission to reproduce or translate
WHO publications – whether for sale or
for noncommercial distribution – should
be addressed to WHO Press at the above
address (fax: +41 22 791 4806;
e-mail: [email protected]).

Disclaimer

This publication contains the collective views
of the Commission on Social Determinants
of Health and does not necessarily represent
the decisions or the stated policy of the
World Health Organization. The designations
employed and the presentation of the material
in this publication do not imply the expression
of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the
World Health Organization concerning the legal
status of any country, territory, city, or area or
of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation

of its frontiers or boundaries. Dotted lines
on maps represent approximate border lines
for which there may not yet be full agreement.

The mention of specific companies or of
certain manufacturers’ products does not
imply that they are endorsed or recommended
by the World Health Organization in preference
to others of a similar nature that are not
mentioned. Errors and omissions excepted,
the names of proprietary products are
distinguished by initial capital letters.

All reasonable precautions have been taken
by the World Health Organization to verify
the information contained in this publication.
However, the published material is being
distributed without warranty of any kind, either
expressed or implied. The responsibility for the
interpretation and use of the material lies with
the reader. In no event shall the World Health
Organization be liable for damages arising
from its use.

WHO/IER/CSDH/08.1

Photos

WHO/Marko Kokic; Rotary Images/Alyce Henson; WHO/Christopher Black;
WHO/Chris De Bode; WHO/Jonathan Perugia; WHO/EURO
Specific photo-credits can be obtained from WHO.

The Commission
calls for closing
the health gap
in a generation
Social justice is a matter of life and death. It affects the
way people live, their consequent chance of illness, and
their risk of premature death. We watch in wonder

Source: CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

State-specific Prevalence of Obesity Among U.S. Adults, by Race/Ethnicity, 2006-2008

Definitions:

  • Obesity: Body mass index (BMI) of 30 or higher.
  • Body mass index (BMI): A measure of an adult’s weight in relation to his or her height, specifically the adult’s weight in kilograms divided by the square of his or her height in meters.

Source: CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

State-specific Prevalence of Obesity Among U.S. Adults, by Race/Ethnicity, 2006-2008

Methods:

  • Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS).
  • Self-reported weights and heights.
  • Limited to three years of data and limited to three racial/ethnic populations; non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, and Hispanics.
  • Age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.

Source: CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

(*BMI 30)

Hispanic

State-specific Prevalence of Obesity* Among U.S. Adults, by Race/Ethnicity, 2006-2008

White non-Hispanic

Black non-Hispanic

Source: CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

(*BMI 30)

White non-Hispanic

State-specific Prevalence of Obesity* Among U.S. Adults, by Race/Ethnicity, 2006-2008

Source: CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

(*BMI 30)

State-specific Prevalence of Obesity* Among U.S. Adults, by Race/Ethnicity, 2006-2008

Black non-Hispanic

Source: CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

(*BMI 30)

Hispanic

State-specific Prevalence of Obesity* Among U.S. Adults, by Race/Ethnicity, 2006-2008

Source: CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

Table. Prevalence of obesity, by region and race/ethnicity, 2006-2008

  Non-Hispanic white Non-Hispanic black Hispanic
Total      
Both sexes 23.7 35.7 28.7
Men 25.4 31.6 27.8
Women 21.8 39.2 29.4
Northeast      
Both sexes 22.6 31.7 26.6
Men 25.0 26.5 26.9
Women 20.0 36.1 26.0
Midwest      
Both sexes 25.4 36.3