• Type of paperResearch Paper
  • SubjectNutrition
  • Number of pages5
  • Format of citationAPA
  • Number of cited resources4
  • Type of serviceWriting

Yellow highlights in the guidelines: my topic and using 4 references from library list using SJSU online library links (I get 5 points extra credit for using 4 from library sources), and reference page is going to be included at the end as well (exclude minimum 4 pages of main paper), clearly stating that the sources are retrieving from SJSU library and such. Grading rubric is there as well so the directions and the goals of the paper should be crystal clear

References

Abdennour, S., & ebrary, I. (2007). Egyptian customs and festivals. Cairo; New York: American University in Cairo Press. Retrieved from http://site.ebrary.com/lib/sjsu/Doc?id=10409557

Brunner, B., & JSTOR eBooks. (2012). Inventing the Christmas tree [Erfindung des Weihnachtsbaums.English]. New Haven Conn.: Yale University Press. Retrieved from http://libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt5vkr9c

Cunha, C. A., Cunha, R., & Ebooks Corporation. (2010). Culture and customs of Portugal. Santa Barbara, Calif.: Greenwood. Retrieved from http://www.SJSU.eblib.com/EBLWeb/patron/?target=patron&extendedid=P_678364_0

Etzioni, A., Bloom, J., & ebrary, I. (2004). We are what we celebrate. New York: New York University Press. Retrieved from http://site.ebrary.com/lib/sjsu/Doc?id=10137136

Forbes, B. D. (2015; 2015). America’s favorite holidays: Candid histories. Oakland, California; 4: University of California Press. Retrieved from http://site.ebrary.com/lib/sjsu/Doc?id=11116555

Gulevich, T., & Gale Group. (2004). Understanding Islam and Muslim traditions. Detroit, Mich.: Omnigraphics. Retrieved from http://libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login?url=http://galenet.galegroup.com/servlet/eBooks?ste=22&docNum=CX1886199999

Harris, M., & ebrary, I. (2003). Carnival and other Christian festivals. Austin: University of Texas Press. Retrieved from http://site.ebrary.com/lib/sjsu/Doc?id=10190666

Kohl, M., & Young, F. The holiday book. Retrieved from http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/009128520

Kraay, H., & ebrary, I. (2013). Days of national festivity in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1823 -1889. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press. Retrieved from http://site.ebrary.com/lib/sjsu/Doc?id=10704776

McCrone, D., McPherson, G., & Palgrave Connect. (2009). National days. Basingstoke England; New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Retrieved from http://libaccess.sjlibrary.org/login?url=http://www.palgraveconnect.com/doifinder/10.1057/9780230251175

O’Leary, M. H., &

 

 

 

 

 

Tea Ceremony in Japan

Joe Liu

San Jose State University

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Origin

Tea was brought to japan from China (China 618-907) by the tang dynasty. The first tea ceremony is hinted in the 8th century by a Chinese Buddhist writer in the book dubbed “Cha Ching”. Tea plants for medicinal consumption by Japanese priests and nobbles hallmarks (Japan 710-794) Religious consumption of tea was a practice developed by Myoan Eisai, the founder of Zen Buddhism in the Rinzai sect temple. Tea processing began during this time. Pounding of tea leaves prior to adding warm water and tea whisking after hot water is poured over it form the origins of tea ceremony (Abdennour & ebrary, 2007). Books titled Ta Kuan Cha Lun – General View of Tea and Kissa Yojoki -Tea drinking is good for health popularized the tea ceremony. In the thirteenth century tea spread from the sung, Kamakura to samurai class. It also saw land size increase to plantains. Tea parties emerged between Gekokujou (parvenus); a dynasty formed after the fall of Kamakura, and Toucha (McCrone, McPherson & Palgrave Connect, 2009).

The parties were characterized by a tea testing game; where, guests were to differentiate Honcha (legitimate tea) with other types of tea. There was gambling on the contestants and important rewards given. Among the samurai, tea was believed to tighten bonds as each member in a party would sip from the same bowl. They later adopted the Shoin tea serving style (Cunha, Cunha & Ebooks Corporation, 2010). This made up the alcove (Tokonoma), the couple of ledges (Chigaidana) within the alcove, as well as the side-alcove counter (Tsuke-shoin) with Taami carpet to coat the ground. The Douboushuu adopted the fixed shoin desk from the Samurai and served tea placed on a large utensil stand (Daisu).

Tea eventually spread to low class people. They held ceremonies in a (Kakoi) small room. Thus the best designer of smaller tea room’s ceremony Murata Shukou was referred to as the Father of Tea ceremony- chanoyu (Gulevich, & Gale Group, 2004). He founded a school on the principle of Zen-inspired tea to teach students the art of designing small tea rooms. In his art he developed the four-and-a-half-mat room, refined simplicity (Kakeru), sober-colored pottery from Bizen and Shigaraki, and the most excellent technique of merging Chinese and Japanese tea apparatus. Tea eventually gained fame and it became an art school with titles such as (Chanoyusha) professional teacher, Wabi-suki – three qualities professional, confidence in the presentation of tea, as well as capacity to perform with good manners relevant to an appropriate master, as well as outstanding practical expertise and Meijin- a combination of a waki-suki and a fine Chines


NuFS 144: Food Culture Research Paper

Task:

1) Present a history of a chosen food or cultural celebration using an anthropological/historical point of view

a) Describe traditional uses of the food in the cultures where it is used

b) Identify historical importance of the food, including symbolic uses and any restrictions on the use of the food

c) Discuss changing uses of the food in the modern world due to immigration and globalization


OR

2) Present a history of a celebration using an anthropological/historical point of view

a) Discuss associated symbolic food(s) and their meaning in the context of the celebration

b) Identify typical preparations

c) Discuss changing uses of the food in the modern world due to immigration and globalization

Acceptable Resources:

· Encyclopedias on Food

· Oxford Companion to Food

· Available electronically through Oxford Reference Online

· Available in the 2nd floor reference area (TX349 .D36 2006)

· Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (this would be good for knowing how a food was and continues to be used in the United States)

· Available electronically through Oxford Reference Online

· Available in the 2nd floor reference area (TX349 .E45 2004)

· Oxford Companion to American Food and Drink

· Available in the 2nd floor reference area (TX349 .O94 2007)

· Cambridge World History of Food

· Available in the 2nd floor reference area (TX353 .C255 2000)

· Encyclopedia of Food and Culture

· Available in the 2nd floor reference area (GT2850 .E53 2003)

· Available electronically through Gale Virtual Reference Library

· Food Cultures of the World Encyclopedia

· Available in the 2nd floor reference area (GT2850

Cultural Celebration Research Paper and Presentation

NuFS 144 sec. 10 and 11

Spring 2017

GELO 2 Identify the historical context of ideas and cultural traditions outside the U.S. and how they have influenced American culture.


Due Dates:

Research Paper:
Sec. 10: Tues, 4/11; Sec. 11: Tues, 4/11

Presentation:

Sec. 10: 4/25, 5/2, 5/4, 5/9, and 5/11

Sec. 11: 4/18, 4/25, 5/2, 5/9, and 5/16

For this project, you will research a traditional cultural celebration featuring symbolic foods. Topics will be chosen from the approved list below, by lottery on the first day of class. You will present a history of the cultural celebration from an anthropological/historical point of view, and you will include discussion of associated symbolic food(s) and the meaning in the context of the celebration, and typical preparations. You will also discuss changes in the celebration in the modern world due to immigration and globalization.

The paper will be 5 pages double-spaced in length and must include a list of at least 4 references in APA format. The best references are publications from the library links provided, with working SJSU library link listed (test the link!). You may use books, journals, magazines, and newspapers. If you use 4 SJSU library sources, you will earn 5 points of extra credit. Websites may be as sources only if they are credible sources of information, in the instructor’s judgment. You should not use information from blogs, FaceBook, personal websites, or wikis. Look for academic/educational, news bureau, travel, tourism, hospitality, or similar sites.

In-paper citations should follow the same approved format (APA). Turnitin.com originality score of 10% or less is expected, and you will be allowed to resubmit your paper.

The presentation should be 5 minutes maximum, and will be an overview of the paper. You should prepare at least 4 PowerPoint slides as visual aids (maps, pictures of food preparations, celebrations, etc.). See rubric below and short PowerPoint posted on the Assignment in Canvas.

Cultural Celebration Topics

· Lunar New Year

· Tet

· Oshogatsu

· Day of the Dead

· Christmas (France)

· Christmas (Italy)

· Diwali

· Seder

· Rosh Hashanah

· Hanukkah

· Autumn Moon Festival

· Weddings (pick a country)

· St. Lucia’s Day

· Songkran

· Oktoberfest in Germany

· Birthdays

· Epiphany/Three Kings Day

· Ramadan

· Yalda Night

· Mardi Gras

· Las Posadas

· Greek Easter

· Quinceanera

· Bar Mitzvah

· Holi

· Nauroz (Nowruz)

· Tea ceremony (Japan)

· Afternoon t

NuFS 144: Cultural Celebration Research Paper – Library Tips


Task

1) Present a history of a celebration using an anthropological/historical point of view

a) Discuss associated symbolic food(s) and their meaning in the context of the celebration

b) Identify typical preparations

c) Discuss changing uses of the food in the modern world due to immigration and globalization


Research Guide for NuFS 144

libguides.sjsu.edu/nufs144


Obtain background information on the cultural celebration

· Go to Gale Virtual Reference Library, an encyclopedic resource (library.sjsu.edu > Articles & Databases > G > Gale Virtual Reference Library)

· Simply type in the celebration in question

· Can’t find it? Look for materials on the country in which the cultural celebration takes place. Example: La Tomatina, the Spanish tomato-throwing festival

Catalog search = spain AND festivals

Retrieved results includes Festivals & Rituals of Spain (http://catalog.sjlibrary.org/record=b1717702~S1), possibly a good resource


Books

· To find both print and electronic books, search the library’s catalog (available on the library’s homepage library.sjsu.edu):

· Tips on searching:

· Restrict your search to “SJSU” to remove all of the public library materials. You will find that there may be lots of children’s picture books on your topic or short non-fictional works. While these may be helpful in gaining an understanding of your celebration, these are not ideal for a college assignment.

· Look for alternate names and/or spellings of your cultural celebration.

· Example: Eid al-Fitr is also known as Fastbreaking Eid, Sweet Festival, Ramadan feast, Eid al-Saghir, Sugar Feast, etc.

· If you can’t find materials on the first item, go through the entire list

· Again, if you cannot find any materials by searching for the celebration name, search the country name and the word holiday, celebration, or festival

· Example: india AND festival (for a search on Holi)

· Retrieved results include The Life of Hinduism (http://catalog.sjlibrary.org/record=b3113827~S6), Growing Stories from India (http://catalog.sjlibrary.org/record=b5075125~S6) – both have a chapter on Holi

· Add “food culture” to your country in question and see if that helps with narrowing down your results

· If you’re looking for a food that is native to a specific country, search the country’s na

Running head: TEA CEREMONY IN JAPAN 1

Tea Ceremony in Japan

Joe Liu

San Jose State University

TEA CEREMONY IN JAPAN 2

The Origin

Tea was brought to Japan from China (618-907 AD) by the Tang Dynasty. The first Tea

Ceremony is hinted in the 8th century by a Chinese Buddhist writer in the book dubbed “Cha

Ching”. Tea plants for medicinal consumption by Japanese priests and nobbles hallmarks (Japan

710-794). Religious consumption of tea was a practice developed by Myoan Eisai, the founder of

Zen Buddhism in the Rinzai sect temple. Tea processing began during this time. Pounding of tea

leaves prior to adding warm water, and tea whisking after hot water is poured over it form the

origins of tea ceremony (Abdennour & ebrary, 2007). Books titled “Ta Kuan Cha Lun” – General

View of Tea, and “Kissa Yojoki” – Tea drinking is good for health popularized the tea ceremony.

In the thirteenth century, tea spread from the Sung, Kamakura to Samurai class. It also saw land

size increase to plantains. Tea parties emerged between Gekokujou (parvenus); a dynasty formed

after the fall of Kamakura, and Toucha (McCrone, McPherson & Palgrave Connect, 2009).

Furthermore, the parties were characterized by a tea testing game; where, guests were to

differentiate Honcha (legitimate tea) with other types of tea. There was gambling on the

contestants and important rewards given. Among the samurai, tea was believed to tighten bonds

as each member in a party would sip from the same bowl. They later adopted the Shoin tea

serving style (Cunha, Cunha & Ebooks Corporation, 2010). This made up the alcove

(Tokonoma), the couple of ledges (Chigaidana) within the alcove, as well as the side-alcove

counter (Tsuke-shoin) with Tatami carpet to coat the ground. The Douboushuu adopted the fixed

shoin desk from the Samurai and served tea placed on a large utensil stand (Daisu).

Tea eventually spread to the low class people. They held ceremonies in a (Kakoi) small

room. Therefore, the best designer of smaller tea room’s ceremony, Murata Shukou was referred

to as the Father of Tea ceremony- chanoyu (Gulevich, & Gale Group, 2004). He founded a

&

nobles

Laurie Steinberg
Laurie Steinberg: this reference doesn’t make sense either. Why would a book about Portuguese culture include this information? There is nothing about Japan in the table of contents.
Laurie Steinberg
La

Directions for using SJSU Library sources

*****Go to library.sjsu.edu, then click “Articles & Databases”, then click “Academic Search Complete”. If you can’t log in, type in my information: Name “Joe Liu” SJSU ID “009034506” PIN “26320070”. Lastly, type in key terms such as “Tea Ceremony in Japan” “Tea Ceremony” something that related to the topic and so on, and the sources don’t have to be scholarly journals, but full text and make sure they are credible papers or websites, and so on.*****

This is just an example of how you are going to do it


Journals (Scholarly articles)

· Academic Search Complete

· Input your search terms

· On the left hand side you will these options:

Example (but follow the direction as the sources have to be scholarly sources and full text!):

· Use the source type option to select the format.

· Academic journals will be scholarly and more comprehensive, but the focus will be very narrow. Academic journals can be helpful for in-depth articles on one aspect of your celebration.

· Example: Dermatoses among Children from Celebration of “Holi,” the Spring Festival, in India

· This article reports on the skin afflictions that may result from the inhalation and application of the colors/dyes that are used during Holi.

· Magazines may be a little lengthier than newspaper articles

· Example: Strength Thru Joy: Holi in Fiji

· This article discusses how Holi is celebrated among Hindu Fijians.

· Newspapers are great for a current treatment on the topic (particularly how your celebration has changed with immigration and globalization)

· Example: A Traditional Hindu Spring Parade in Queens is Canceled as Organizers Feud

· The Phagwah or Holi parade is cancelled, due to organizer infighting, which some think is “a reflection of the increasing complexity within a growing population, with combustible differences being a natural outgrowth of the community’s social and political evolution.”