see below attachment for assignment details

Assignment Details

Outcomes addressed:

NU310-5: Integrate evidence into clinically relevant, interprofessional practice.

GEL 6.01: Create a clear plan and appropriate scope for research.

Purpose.

After completion of this assignment, you should be able to correctly identify components of a research report, correctly assign the level of evidence of a research report, and integrate research evidence for clinical practice.

 

Title/study purpose

Research design

Sampling/Data collection method

Level of evidence

Primary or secondary source

Outcome/

Brief statement of how this relates to clinical practice

APA reference (format as you would in a reference list)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Access and read the five articles listed below and place them correctly into a table format as shown above.

1. The role of UK district nurses in providing care for adult patients with a terminal diagnosis: A meta-ethnography

2. The role of motivation and self-efficacy on the practice of health promotion behaviors in the overweight and obese middle-aged American women

3. Comparison of patient perception of telehealth-supported and specialist nursing interventions for early stage COPD: A qualitative study

4. Intervention to improve the quality of antimicrobial prescribing for urinary tract infection: A cluster randomize

134� International Journal of Palliative Nursing 2015, Vol 21, No 3

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Abstract
Aim: To explore the role of UK district nurses in providing care for
adult patients with a terminal diagnosis by reviewing qualitative
research. Design: Meta-ethnography was used to conduct the
synthesis. Data sources: CINAHL, MEDLINE and British Nursing
Index (BNI) were searched comprehensively for primary research
relating to the role of UK district nurses in palliative care. Review
methods: The abstracts and titles of 700 papers were screened
against inclusion criteria, of these 97 full papers were appraised. Some
24 studies reported in 25 papers were selected for inclusion in the
synthesis. Findings: In total, five key themes were identified: valuing
the role; practical role; relationships with patients and families;
providing psychological support; and role uncertainty. Further
synthesis yielded two ‘lines of argument’. The concept of the ‘expert
friend’ argues that the atypical relationship district nurses cultivate
with patients underpins district nurses’ provision of palliative care and
profoundly influences the nature of psychological support given.
Secondly, the concept of ‘threat and opportunity’ encapsulates the
threat district nurses can feel to their traditional role in palliative care
through changing health and social policy, while recognising the
benefits that access to specialist knowledge and better training can
bring. Conclusion: The findings have implications for understanding
the motivators and barriers experienced by district nurses delivering
palliative care in a time of unprecedented change to community
health services.
Key words: Palliative care l District nurse l Meta-ethnography l
Community heath nursing

This article has been subject to double-blind peer review.

Palliative care has been fundamental to dis-trict nurses (DNs) ever since William Rathbone first employed a nurse to look
after his dying wife in 1859 (Toofany, 2007). After
his wife’s death, he retained her services and sent
her (and subsequently other nurses) out into the
‘districts’ of Liverpool to tend to the health of the
poor (Queens Nursing Institute, 2013). From this
was born district nursing. At that time, and for
many years afterwards, the majority of people died
in their own homes, and DNs, who had provided
care throughout patients’ lives remained central to
providing care in their final days of life (Pellet,

2009). However, the 20th century saw an insidious
migration of health care from community to hospi-
tal. Along with the medical treatment of illness
came the medicalisation of death itself (Smith,
2000; Kellehear, 2007). Dying patients were
removed from home and family, to die a modern
death in the new NHS (Clark, 2002). Illich (1976)
and others began to suggest t

R E S E A R C H P A P E R

The role of motivation and self-efficacy on the
practice of health promotion behaviours in

the overweight and obese middle-aged
American women

Kathleen Fisher FNP-BC DNP RN
Lecturer II, Nursing, University of Michigan-Flint, Flint, Michigan, USA

Suha Al-Oballi Kridli PhD RN
Associate Professor, School of Nursing, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan, USA

Accepted for publication January 2013

Fisher K, Kridli S A-O. International Journal of Nursing Practice 2014; 20: 327–335.
The role of motivation and self-efficacy on the practice of health promotion behaviours in the

overweight and obese middle-aged American women

The study investigated the relationship between motivation, self-efficacy and demographic variables, and determined if
they affect the performance of health promotion behaviours in overweight or obese middle-aged American women. The
sample consisted of middle-aged American women from a small town in Michigan. Two groups of women aged 30–65,
one with a body mass index (BMI) range of 25–29, and the second with a BMI of ≥ 30, completed the Health
Self-Determinism Index, the General Self-Efficacy Scale and the Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile-II. Self-efficacy was
found to be a significant predictor in the performance of health-promoting behaviours in both the overweight and obese
participants in this study. Motivation was not found to be a significant predictor of performance of health promotion
behaviours in either participant group. Education was found to be a significant predictor of performance of health
promotion behaviours in the obese participants only. Nurses need to develop effective methods of supporting self-efficacy
in both the overweight and obese middle-aged American women. Nursing-based research focusing on interventions to
improve self-efficacy, as well as studies identifying effective educational techniques to improve the practice of health
promotion behaviours in this population is necessary. Further investigation into the effect of motivation and demographics
on the performance of health promotion behaviours is also needed.

Key words: female, health promotion, motivation, obese, overweight, self-efficacy.

Overweight and obesity are a major health problem in
America. It is estimated that about 66% of American
adults are overweight, and one in three are obese.1,2

Body mass index (BMI) is a standard that correlates body
weight with the risk of developing chronic health
conditions that are associated with obesity.1–3 A BMI
between 18 and 24.9 is considered normal, whereas a
BMI between 25 and 30 is considered overweight, and a
BMI > 30 is considered obese. A BMI of ≥ 40 is consid-
ered super obese.3,4

Correspondence: Suha Al-Oballi Kridli, School of Nursing, Oakland
University, Rochester, MI 48309, USA. Email:

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access

Comparison of patient perceptions of
Telehealth-supported and specialist nursing
interventions for early stage COPD: a
qualitative study
Deborah A. Fitzsimmons1,2*, Jill Thompson3, Claire L. Bentley2 and Gail A. Mountain2

Abstract

Background: The increasing prevalence and associated cost of treating Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
(COPD) is unsustainable, and focus is needed on self-management and prevention of hospital admissions.
Telehealth monitoring of patients’ vital signs allows clinicians to prioritise their workload and enables patients to
take more responsibility for their health. This paper reports the results of a qualitative study embedded within a
feasibility and pilot Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) of Telehealth-supported care within a community-based
COPD supported-discharge service. The aim of the study was to qualitatively explore the experiences of patients
with COPD who had received either a Telehealth-supported or a specialist nursing intervention following their
discharge from hospital after an admission for a COPD exacerbation.

Methods: Patients were invited to either participate in semi-structured interviews or to complete a semi-structured
self-administered questionnaire on completion of the intervention. Nine patients were interviewed (67 % female)
and seventeen patients completed the questionnaires. In addition, three clinicians responsible for the delivery of
both interventions were interviewed to obtain their perspectives on the new services.

Results: Seven underlying themes emerged from the patient interviews and were further explored in the
questionnaires: (1) patient demographics; (2) information received by the participants; (3) installation of the
Telehealth technology; (4) Telehealth service functionality; (5) visits; (6) service withdrawal; and (7) service
perceptions. Recipients of both services reported feelings of safety derived from the delivery of an integrated,
community-based service.

Conclusions: Although recipients of the Telehealth service received 50 % fewer home visits from the
clinicians than recipients of a more traditional community-based nursing intervention, the patients were
enthusiastic about the service, with some describing it as the best service they had ever received. This
suggests that a Telehealth intervention is an acceptable alternative to a more traditional home nursing visit
model for monitoring community-based patients with COPD following their discharge from hospital.

Trial registration: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN68856013

Keywords: Qualitative, Patient-centred care, Innovation, Technology, Telehealth, COPD

* Correspondence: [email protected]
1School of Health Studies, Western University, Arthur and Sonia Labatt Healt

Research CMAJ

108 CMAJ, February 2, 2016, 188(2) ©2016 8872147 Canada Inc. or its licensors

I
n its recent global report on antimicrobial
resistance, the World Health Organization
warned that widespread resistance is not just

a future threat but a present-day reality. Many of
the current treatment options for common infec-
tions are becoming less effective.1,2 The World
Health Organization pointed out that tackling
antimicrobial resistance requires a multisectoral
approach involving patients, health care work-
ers, policy-makers and industry.2

With the Supporting the Improvement and
Management of Prescribing (SIMPle) study, we
aimed to improve antimicrobial prescribing for
urinary tract infection in primary care through a
multifaceted complex intervention with interac-
tive, multimedia and electronic components
integrated into routine care.3 In this article, we

report on the quality of prescribing measured
against national guidelines for the prescribing of
antimicrobials.4

Methods

The study protocol was described previously.3
The SIMPle study was a 3-armed complex inter-
vention, with practice-level randomization. Eli-
gible practices were members of the Irish Pri-
mary Care Research Network that were using a
particular type of patient management software.
The Irish Primary Care Research Network is an
established national research network of general
practices. Of the 32 eligible practices invited by
letter, 30 confirmed their participation in a fol-
low-up phone call. Upon confirmation, each

Intervention to improve the quality of antimicrobial
prescribing for urinary tract infection: a cluster
randomized trial

Akke Vellinga PhD, Sandra Galvin PhD, Sinead Duane PhD, Aoife Callan PhD, Kathleen Bennett PhD,
Martin Cormican MD, Christine Domegan PhD, Andrew W. Murphy MD

Competing interests:
Subsequent to this study,
Aoife Callan became an
employee of Novartis
Ireland. No other competing
interests were declared.

This article has been peer
reviewed.

Accepted: Sept. 28, 2015
Online: Nov. 16, 2015

Correspondence to:
Akke Vellinga,
[email protected]

CMAJ 2016. DOI:10.1503 /
cmaj.150601

Background: Overuse of antimicrobial therapy
in the community adds to the global spread of
antimicrobial resistance, which is jeopardizing
the treatment of common infections.

Methods: We designed a cluster randomized
complex intervention to improve antimicro-
bial prescribing for urinary tract infection in
Irish general practice. During a 3-month base-
line period, all practices received a workshop
to promote consultation coding for urinary
tract infections. Practices in intervention arms
A and B received a second workshop with
i

STUDY PROTOCOL Open Access

Pain Intervention for people with Dementia
in nursing homes (PID): study protocol for a
quasi-experimental nurse intervention
Andrea Koppitz1* , Georg Bosshard2, Geneviève Blanc1, Hannele Hediger1, Sheila Payne3 and Thomas Volken4

Abstract

Background: It is estimated that 19 to 83% of people with dementia suffer from pain that is inadequately treated
in the last months of life. A large number of healthcare workers who care for these people in nursing homes lack
appropriate expertise and may therefore not always recognise, assess and treat pain in those with dementia who
have complex problems on time, properly and efficiently. The aim of this intervention trial is to identify care needs
of people with dementia suffering from pain living in a nursing home.

Methods: A quasi-experimental nurse-led intervention trial based on a convenience sample of four nursing homes
in the Swiss Canton of Zurich examines the effects on dementia patients (n = 411), the healthcare institution and
the qualification level of the healthcare workers compared to historical controls, using an event analysis and a
multilevel analysis. Healthcare workers will be individually trained how to assess, intervene and evaluate acute and
chronic pain. There are three data-monitoring cycles (T0, T1, T2) and two intervention cycles (I1, I2) with a total
study duration of 425 days. There is also a process evaluation based on Dobbins analyses that analyse in particular
the potentials for change in clinical practice of change agents.

Discussion: The aim of the intervention trial is to improve pain management strategies in older people with
dementia in nursing homes. Clinically significant findings will be expected that will help reduce suffering in the
sense of “total pain” for people with dementia. The joint intra- and interdisciplinary collaboration between practice
and supply-oriented (nursing) research will have both a lasting effect on the efficiency measurement and provide
scientifically sound results. Nursing homes can integrate the findings from the intervention trial into their internal
quality control process. The potential for improvements can be directly influenced by the nursing home itself.

Trial registration: Registration trial number: DRKS00009726 on DRKS, registered 10 January 2017, retrorespectively
registered. Clearance certificate is available of the ethics committees of the canton of Thurgau, Switzerland, number:
TG K201-02, and Zurich, Switzerland, number: ZH 01–2016.

Keywords: Dementia, Pain, Intervention, Nursing home

Background
Approximately 25% of people over the age of 85 years in
Switzerland live in retirement and nursing homes. The
average length of stay is 2.6 years [1]. More than half the
people in nursing homes live with symptoms of dementia
or have been diagnosed with dementia [2]. People with
dementia show the characteristi

Unit9_Assignment

Instructions: First enter total points possible in cell C13, under the rubric. Next enter scores (between 0 and 4) into yellow cells only in column F.
NU310_Unit 8 Assignment_GradingRubric:
Inappropriate Below Average Average Above Average Score Weight Final Score
0-1.5 1.5-2.5 2.5-3.5 4
Study purpose Incorrect or missing purpose of all studies The student vaguely addresses the study purpose of less than 25% of the studies The student correctly identifies the study purpose of over 50% of the assigned studies; some details missing The student correctly and completely identifies the purpose of all 5 studies 15% 0.00
Research design Content is missing or incomplete The student correctly addresses the research design of less than 25% of the studies The student correctly identifies the research design of over 50% of the assigned studies; some details missing The student correctly and completely identifies the research design of all 5 studies 15% 0.00
 sampling methodology and data collection procedure Content is missing or incomplete The student correctly addresses the sampling and data collection of less than 25% of the studies The student correctly identifies the sampling and data collection method of over 50% of the assigned studies; some details missing The student correctly identifies the methodology of all 5 research studies 15% 0.00
level of research evidence student does not correctly identify the level of evidence of any study student correctly identifies the level of evidence of less than 25% of studies student correctly identifies the level of evidence of over 50% of the studies; some details omitted student correctly identifies the level of evidence for all 5 studies 15% 0.00
primary or secondary source Content is missing or incomplete student correctly identifies as primary or secondary of less than 25% of studies student correctly identifies as primary or secondary of over 50% of the studies; some details omitted student correctly identifies the source as primary or secondary for all 5 studies 15% 0.00
Outcome/application to clinical practice Content is missing or incomplete student vaguely addresses the outcome and application to practice of less than 25% of the studies

References

These will not indent the second line but on your papers they should be–you can hit “control t”  to indent the second line.

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Arbaugh, J.B. (2001). How instructor immediacy behaviors affect student satisfaction and learning in Web-based courses. Business Communication Quarterly, 64(4), 42-54.

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Arbaugh, J. B., Cleveland-Innes, M., Diaz, S. R., Garrison, D. R., Ice, P., Richardson, J. C., & Swan, K. P. (2008). Developing a community of inquiry instrument: Testing a measure of the Community of Inquiry framework using a multi-institutional sample. The Internet and Higher Education, 11(3-4), 133-136.

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Baker, R., Harrison, J., Thornton, B., & Yates, R. (2007). An analysis of the effectiveness of podcasting as a supplementary instructional tool: A pilot study. Paper Presented at the 2007 EABR & ETLC Conference. Ljubjana, Slovenia.

Belanger, Y. (2005, June). Duke University iPod first year experience final evaluation report. Retrieved from http://cit.duke.edu/pdf/ipod_initiative_04_05.pdf

Bell, P., & Winn, W. (2000). Distributed cognition, by nature and by design. In D. H. Jonassen & S. M. Land (Ed.). Theoretical foundations of learning environments. (pp.123-145). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Bender, T. (2003). Discussion-based online teaching to enhance student learning. Theory, practice and assessment. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

Berge, Z. L. (1995). Facilitating computer conferencing: Recommendations from the field. Educational Technology, 15(1), 22-30. Retrieved from http://www.emoderators.com/moderators/teach_online.html

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Bloom, B. S. (1956). Taxonomy of educational objectives: The classification of educationa