Module 1 – SLP

INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNITY HEALTH

Using MAP-IT to Help Build a Healthy Community

Please read the following: Healthy People in Healthy Communities, or A Strategy for Creating a Healthy Community: MAP-IT, so that you will understand the MAP-IT program before you start this SLP. Also please read this article: Melany Mack, Ron Uken, Jane Powers (2006) People Improving the Community’s Health: Community Health Workers as Agents of Change, Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved. Nashville: Feb 2006. Vol. 17, Iss. 1; p. 16 (10 pages) This article is also listed on the Background page and can be found in ProQuest. To begin to achieve the goal of improving health, a community must develop a strategy. That strategy, to be successful, must be supported by many individuals who are working together.

In much the same way you might map out a trip to a new place, you can use the MAP-IT technique to ‘map out’ the path toward the change you want to see in your community.

For the Session Long Project (SLP) of this course, you will follow one of the following families:

  • A non-English speaking immigrant family. The parents (35-year-old father and a 31-year-old mother) have a 1-year-old son. They (the parents) are obese, smokers, alcoholics and have only a high school education. Due to their weight, the mother has diabetes and high blood pressure, and the father has high blood pressure and kidney disease. The parents are a low income family with no insurance. You will guide the parents on how to achieve the minimum state health requirements for both the child and themselves (i.e., vaccinations, good nutrition, a safe and healthy home environment, etc.).

    OR

  • An English-speaking American family. The parents (42-year-old father and a 40-year-old mother) have two children, a 14-year-old son and an 18-year-old daughter. They (the parents) are obese, smokers, and have a history of heavy drug use in their late teen and early adult years. The father has only a high school education while the mother has a BA in English Literature. Due to their weight, the mother has diabetes and high blood pressure, and the father has high blood pressure and liver aliments. The son suffers from asthma while the daughter has had two previous abortions. She may be drug dependent. The parents are a moderate-low income family with minimal insurance. You will guide the parents on how to achieve the minimum state health requirements for both the children and themselves (i.e., vaccinations, good nutrition, a safe and healthy home environment, etc.).

SLP Module Requirements

You are to use MAP-IT: Mobilize, Assess, Plan, Implement, and Track to respond to this SLP.

Before you begin the SLP please review: Choosing the Right Approach for Health

Steps in MAP-IT are:

  • Mobilize individuals and organizations that care about the health of your community into a coalition.
  • Assess the areas of greatest need in your community, in this case, assisting new immigrants to access health care], as well as the resources and other strengths that you can tap into in order to address those areas.
  • Plan your approach: start with a vision of where you want to be as a community, then add strategies and action steps to help you achieve that vision: you can be a health educator, a health care provider, a nutritionist, a social worker etc.
  • Implement your plan using concrete action steps that can be monitored and will make a difference.
  • Track your progress over time.

KEY Criteria for grading this SLP

In addition to demonstrating that you are applying the MAP-IT steps, you must demonstrate personal development or competency in developing appropriate objectives for your targeted family based on needs and the ability to appraise the appropriateness of resources and materials required to meet their needs. You should also incorporate the results of the needs assessment of your targeted family into the planning process within MAP-IT. This is why it is so important to identify an actual community that your targeted family resides. You will find that almost all of the resources found or available in a community can be identified online.

Using this MAP-IT approach, a step-by-step, structured plan can be devised to tailor one’s community needs.

The first step in building a healthier community is to mobilize key individuals and organizations to form a community-wide coalition. Most communities already have health departments and other governmental agencies that are responsible for public health services. Many communities also have coalitions of key individuals and organizations that are organized to address specific issues, for example, block associations or neighborhood watch groups. These groups often represent diverse interests and resources for addressing issues that are vital to building and maintaining the health and stability of the entire community. A coalition will often, of course, work with the health department and other health organizations in the community. However, it can also help mobilize a wider range of other resources to address health issues.

SLP Assignment Expectations

Your task for Module 1 is to:

  1. Select which family for which you will use the MAP-IT Approach for the SLP.
  2. Discuss how you will Mobilize individuals and organizations that care about the health of your community into a coalition. Identify the individuals and organizations which will form the basis of your coalition. Discuss how each member of your coalition can assist each member of your target family.
  3. Briefly discuss the problems that underserved populations are confronted with when seeking care in the community.

Module 2: For this module you will assess the areas of greatest need in your community, in this case, assisting your target family to access health care, as well as the resources and other strengths that you can tap into in order to address those areas.

Module 3: For this module you will discuss how you will plan your approach. Start with a vision of where you want the community to be, and then add strategies and action steps to help you achieve that vision. You can be a health educator, a health care provider, a nutritionist, a social worker, etc. However, base your vision and approach on your targeted family. Additionally, be sure to focus on the health issues related to your targeted family.

Module 4: Discuss how you will implement your plan using concrete action steps that can be monitored and will make a difference. Discuss how you will track your progress over time. Present any tables or charts if you believe they will assist you in effectively tracking your progress (and of course, the progress of the target family). Provide sufficient detail.

Submit the module SLP before end of the specific module. Each SLP should be from 3 to 5 pages (600 to 1,200 words) unless otherwise specified and include 3-5 peer-reviewed reference citations. You will submit the SLP as a complete paper at the end of this session as a cumulative project. Be sure to upload all assignments when they are completed. The completed SLP should be approximately 25 pages (plus/minus 3 pages) and double-spaced.

CHOOSING THE RIGHT APPROACH FOR HEALTH

Plan for your planning. Before EZ/ECs begin health planning activities, decide on the approach they will take. Who are the leaders and stakeholders that need to be involved? What sort of planning structure will they work with? Who will be held accountable? What is the time line? These are the important questions that should be answered before convening steering committees or advisory groups. Thinking through the questions and answers up front will lead to an organized process and smooth transition from plan to action.

Healthy Boston is an initiative that focuses on making things happen in communities in an inclusive manner. The vision for Healthy Boston was to use a 6 million dollar fund to help self-identified communities within the city to establish coalitions, define their own needs, use their own resources in a more efficient manner and be in a stronger position to negotiate with the city government and other outside agencies regarding resources and services. To begin this initiative, the Boston Commissioner of the Department of Health and Hospitals, Judith Kurland, convened a “visioning group” consisting of the Department of Health and Hospital’s (DHH) staff and asked that they draft a blueprint that would:

1. Facilitate collaboration and integration of human services at the local and neighborhood levels

2. Encourage communities to partner with local government to define and work on addressing their own priorities

3. Restore some of the social and civic infrastructure that makes communities strong, viable and healthy and ultimately;

4. Lead to an improved quality of life for Boston residents.

With the basic framework in place, Kurland convened an advisory committee of city department heads and community leaders. They worked to gain support for the initiative in city hall and from community leaders. The group was successful enough to generate city government interest in their ideas that it became the focus of the city department heads’ December 1990 retreat. This retreat led to the establishment of the Human Services Cabinet, which was designed to coordinate the development and implementation of the program among the various city departments. Eventually, the name “Healthy Boston” was coined for the initiative and a formal link was established with the international 

healthy cities movement

. Through this connection, Healthy Boston staff were able to visit Cali, Columbia in the winter of 1993 to see what kinds of initiatives were possible.

Shortly after the conference, the Boston City Hospital became eligible for enhanced funding from the US Department of Human Service’s Medicaid Program. This was due to the disproportionately high number of hospital patients with incomes below the poverty level. DHH began to design a compr

Module 1 – MAP-IT – Creating a Healthy Community

INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNITY HEALTH

II. A Strategy for Creating a Healthy Community: MAP-IT

To begin to achieve the goal of improving health, a community must develop a strategy. That strategy, to be successful, must be supported by many individuals who are working together.

In much the same way you might map out a trip to a new place, you can use the MAP-IT technique to ‘map out’ the path toward the change you want to see in your community.

The process of creating a healthy community will take time, much effort, and many steps. This guide recommends that you MAP-IT–that is, Mobilize, Assess, Plan, Implement, and Track. This MAP-IT approach will help you understand and remember the specific steps you will need to take and the order in which you should take them. Keep in mind, though, that there is no one way to do this, and many of these steps will need to be taken again and again.

Mobilize individuals and organizations that care about the health of your community into a coalition.

Assess the areas of greatest need in your community, as well as the resources and other strengths that you can tap into to address those areas.

Plan your approach: start with a vision of where you want to be as a community; then add strategies and action steps to help you achieve that vision.

Implement your plan using concrete action steps that can be monitored and will make a difference.

Track your progress over time. 

Using this MAP-IT approach, your coalition can devise a step-by-step, structured plan that is tailored to your community’s needs.

MOBILIZE Key Individuals and Organizations

A public health nurse in a small New England suburban community is greatly concerned about the alarming increase in obesity in school-aged children. She needs action models and guidance she can use to help her mobilize the community and put together a healthy weight educational program to use in the community and in the local public schools. The nurse needs to mobilize others in her community to act.

Mobilize individuals and organizations into a community coalition that cares about the health of its community.

The first step in building a healthier community is to mobilize key individuals and organizations to form a communitywide coalition. Most communities already have health departments and other governmental agencies that are responsible for public health services. Many communities also have coalitions of key individuals and organizations that have organized to address specific issues, for example, block associations or neighborhood watch groups. These groups often represent diverse interests and resources for addressing issues that are vital to building and maintaining the health and stability of the entire

Module 1 – SLP

INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNITY HEALTH

Using MAP-IT to Help Build a Healthy Community

Please read the following: 
Healthy People in Healthy Communities
, or 
A Strategy for Creating a Healthy Community: MAP-IT
, so that you will understand the MAP-IT program before you start this SLP. Also please read this article: Melany Mack, Ron Uken, Jane Powers (2006) People Improving the Community’s Health: Community Health Workers as Agents of Change, Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved. Nashville: Feb 2006. Vol. 17, Iss. 1; p. 16 (10 pages) This article is also listed on the Background page and can be found in ProQuest. To begin to achieve the goal of improving health, a community must develop a strategy. That strategy, to be successful, must be supported by many individuals who are working together.

In much the same way you might map out a trip to a new place, you can use the MAP-IT technique to ‘map out’ the path toward the change you want to see in your community.

For the Session Long Project (SLP) of this course, you will follow one of the following families:

· A non-English speaking immigrant family. The parents (35-year-old father and a 31-year-old mother) have a 1-year-old son. They (the parents) are obese, smokers, alcoholics and have only a high school education. Due to their weight, the mother has diabetes and high blood pressure, and the father has high blood pressure and kidney disease. The parents are a low income family with no insurance. You will guide the parents on how to achieve the minimum state health requirements for both the child and themselves (i.e., vaccinations, good nutrition, a safe and healthy home environment, etc.).

OR

· An English-speaking American family. The parents (42-year-old father and a 40-year-old mother) have two children, a 14-year-old son and an 18-year-old daughter. They (the parents) are obese, smokers, and have a history of heavy drug use in their late teen and early adult years. The father has only a high school education while the mother has a BA in English Literature. Due to their weight, the mother has diabetes and high blood pressure, and the father has high blood pressure and liver aliments. The son suffers from asthma while the daughter has had two previous abortions. She may be drug dependent. The parents are a moderate-low income family with minimal insurance. You will guide the parents on how to achieve the minimum state health requirements for both the children and themselves (i.e.,

Healthy People
in

Healthy
Communities

A Community Planning Guide Using
Healthy People 2010

Healthy People
in

Healthy
Communities

Dear Community Leader:

More than 20 years ago the Nation embarked on a significant
journey to make our communities healthier and happier places.
Using the HEALTHY PEOPLE Initiative, which began in 1979, we have
learned that we can make a difference. The current phase, HEALTHY
PEOPLE 2010, has two overarching goals: to increase the quality and
years of healthy life of all Americans and to eliminate disparities in
health status. Its vision is deceptively simple: Healthy People in
Healthy Communities. But to reach these goals, to achieve this
vision, we must all work together–individuals and communities
alike.

The road to improving health for all is wrought with obstacles. We
cannot let our resolve fail. We must continue to work together to
make certain the benefits of health are available to all.

This guide is designed to help you—someone who has decided to
make your community a healthier place to live. This guide provides
information about the steps involved in forming and running a
healthy community coalition. It also includes “Strategies for Suc-
cess,” to help you get activities started in your community, plus
resources, references, and a one page ‘quick-aid’ with hints for
putting HEALTHY PEOPLE 2010 to work for your community.

I applaud your efforts thus far and challenge you to forge ahead on
the journey toward our ultimate destination, becoming an entire
Nation of Healthy People.

Sincerely yours,

David Satcher, M.D., Ph.D.
Surgeon General

A Community Planning Guide Using
Healthy People 2010

Healthy People
in

Healthy
Communities

Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
Office of Public Health and Science

Department of Health and Human Services

Acknowledgments
This publication was developed by the Office of Disease Prevention and Health
Promotion (ODPHP) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

Primary authors: Matthew Guidry, Tom Vischi, Raymond Han, and Omar
Passons. Additional assistance was provided by Randolph F. Wykoff, Linda
Meyers, Debbie Maiese, Janice T. Radak, Mary Jo Deering, Gloria Barnes, Tami
Lambert, and Valere Byrd. In addition, the contributions of the following review-
ers are greatly appreciated:

Phillip Caillouet
Health Informatics Center of Acadiana
University of Louisiana

Melissa Clarke
Health Resources and Services
Administration/HHS

Regan Crump
Health Resources and Services
Administration/HHS

Michael Hatcher
Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention/ HHS

Tim Jeffries
U.S. Department of Housing and
Urban Development

John Kesler
Coalition for Health