Below are the instructions for this assignment. 

Needed ASAP BY TOMORROW MORNING 9AM

Minimum 5 pages.

Below I am also providing examples and what I am basically looking to talk about for my final paper. 

Must provide any citations in APA format. 

Direction and Rubric for Materials/Methods

Submitted in Ethical and or Cultural/Perspectives of Inquiry

The purpose of the materials and methods section is to explain your research in such detail that it could be repeated by another group of scientists and their results would be identical to yours. These sections in all scholarly papers are written in paragraph form and do not include any bullet point lists. It is also written in the past tense and formally. There will be less in text citations in this section in comparison to the lit review and the conclusion, but they are NOT optional. If you are using someone else’s idea or information that is not common knowledge you MUST cite the source. These sections do not include background information. If you find yourself writing about anything other than materials and methods used it need to go in either you lit review or conclusion. It is purely the recipe of the research paper.


Researchers

First you must identify (if you have them)

· Independent variable (there will only be one)

· Dependent variables (you will need 2 at least)

· Variables you will control for

· Control Group

· Experimental group

* THIS IS MY IN-CLASS ASSIGNMENT (WHAT I PICKED AS MY CONTROL & EXPERIMENTAL GROUP AND INDEPENDENT AND DEPENDANT VARIABLES) *

1). In your own words, define the following terms:

Control group = the group in a study/ experiment that doesn’t get treatment by researchers and is used as a standard to measure how the other tested members in the group do.

Experimental group = the group in an experiment that gets the variable being tested.

Independent variable = variable that is changed/controlled in an experiment to test the effects on the dependent variable.

Dependent variable = variable being tested and measured in a scientific experiment.

2). Now decide how you will apply each one in your study:

What is your control group? Patients who are in palliative care and receiving psychiatric assistance.

What is/are your experimental group(s)? Palliative care patients who are not receiving psychiatric assistance. 

What is independent variable? Benefits and outcome of mental well-being for patients and families of patients not receiving palliative care.

What is your dependent variable? Benefits and outcome of mental well-being for patients and families of patients receiving palliative care. 

3). For your results, you will need at least two graphs. Briefly describe what you intend to show in each graph.

– Graph 1 describes % of patients who suffer from mental illness and benefit from palliative psychiatry. 

– Graph 2 descr


In the Materials and Methods section you explain clearly how you conducted your study

in order to: (1) enable readers to evaluate the work performed and (2) permit others to replicate your study.

You must describe exactly what you did: what and how experiments were run, what,how much, how often, where, when, and why equipment and materials were used. The main consideration is to ensure that enough detail is provided to verify your findings and to enable the replication of the study.

You should maintain a balance between brevity (you cannot describe every technical issue) and completeness (you need to give adequate detail so that readers know what happened).

This should be the easiest section to write.

1. Order your procedures chronologically or by type of procedure and then

chronologically within type of procedure using sub-headings, where appropriate, to

clarify what you did. It is up to you to decide what order of presentation will make the most sense to your reader.

2. Use the past tense and the third person to describe what you did. For example: “The sample was incubated at 37ºC for 3 days.” – NOT: “I incubate the sample at 37ºC for 3

days.”

3. Describe your experimental design clearly, including the hypotheses you tested,

variables measured, how many replicates you had, controls, treatments, etc.

4. Explain why each procedure was done. Reference may be made to a published

paper as an alternative to describing a lengthy procedure.

5. Identify the source of any specific type of equipment, a specific enzyme, organism,

or a culture from a particular supplier, which is critical to the success of the experiment.

6. Describe in detail any modifications to equipment or equipment constructed

specifically for the study and, if pertinent, provide illustrations of the modifications.

7. Precisely quantify measurements (all metric) and include errors of measurement.

8. Describe the dates and the site where your field study was conducted including

physical and biological characteristics of the site, if pertinent to the study’s objectives.

9. Identify treatments using the variable or treatment name, rather than an ambiguous, generic name or number (e.g., use “healthy donors” rather than “group 1”).

Other points to consider when writing the Materials and Methods:

1. Don’t mix results with procedures.

2. Omit all explanatory information and background – save it for the discussion.

3. Don’t include information that is irrelevant to the reader, such as what color ice

bucket you used, or which individual logged in the data.

Dependent Variable

The variable that depends on other factors that are measured. These variables are expected to ch

Materials and Methods

Need to provide sufficient detail to allow a reader to envision what was done and to repeat the procedures if needed.

The difference between trivial and critical details may depend on the goals of the study.

Sub-sections (indicated by subtitles) may be useful for organization (e.g., field sampling and lab procedures, etc.).

Materials and Methods

Some rules:

Always use the past tense.

Materials and Methods

Some rules:

Always use the past tense.

Be organized: subheadings can help the reader, especially if the paper has discrete parts such as lab and field work, data and models, etc.

Materials and Methods

Some rules:

Always use the past tense.

Be organized: subheadings can help the reader, especially if the paper has discrete parts such as lab and field work, data and models, etc.

Subheadings should differ in font and position from major headings.

Materials and Methods

Some rules:

Always use the past tense.

Be organized: subheadings can help the reader, especially if the paper has discrete parts such as lab and field work, data and models, etc.

Subheadings should differ in font and position from major headings.

The reader should be able to see, in his or her mind’s eye, the activity, and should be able to recreate what was done. This allows readers to decide whether or not what we did was legitimate, and allows them to replicate the study or experiment as much as possible. If a reader could not understand what you did and could not replicate it, there is insufficient detail.

Materials and Methods

Some rules:

Always use the past tense.

Be organized: subheadings can help the reader, especially if the paper has discrete parts such as lab and field work, data and models, etc.

Subheadings should differ in font and position from major headings.

The reader should be able to see, in his or her mind’s eye, the activity, and should be able to recreate what was done. This allows readers to decide whether or not what we did was legitimate, and allows them to replicate the study or experiment as much as possible. If a reader could not understand what you did and could not replicate it, there is insufficient detail.

How much detail is too much? It depends on the nature of the study. What is trivial for one study may be essential for another. Date and time, place, type of net, boat, etc., can all be important or not.

Maps, diagrams (e.g., of a net or other piece of gear), and other figures can help describe the methods.

A map or chart might show not only the location of the lake, for example, but also the sampling sites. Often maps need multiple panels to show the loca

Running head: PALLIATIVE PSYCHIATRY 1

PALLIATIVE PSYCHIATRY 9

Palliative Psychiatry

Aileen Gonzalez

West Coast University

Introduction

Despite death being part and parcel of human life, it is usually treated as an illness. That is why there are the palliative care services that aim at increasing and improving the quality of people living with serious terminal and chronic illnesses. The focus of this particular unit of healthcare is to minimize the effects of the symptoms, and the stress suffered when one is seriously distressed. Like other medical services, the care also comprises of the palliative psychiatry, which in this case focus on people with mental illnesses rather than the general illnesses. Primarily, the services are offered by a team of professionals comprising of the nurses, doctors, and other specialists; who work together to ensure that the patients receive support. They guarantee that individuals under their observation have access to an extra layer of support despite their age and the stage of disease they are in.

Background of Palliative Psychiatry


Psychiatry and palliative care are said to have a common medical ground. The two are interrelated in that a large portion of patients receiving the palliative care tend to suffer from mental-related issues like anxiety and depression. Thus, the proposal by the World Health Organization for all the mentally ill patients receiving psychiatric medication should be introduced to the long-term residential care that resembles the palliative care (WHO, 2016). Palliative Psychiatry was introduced to care for the people who suffer neglect due to persistent mental illnesses as well as the aggressive people within their current mental status (Keszte et al., 2013). The high number of people suffering from Schizophrenia and inadequacy of quality life expectancy, those living with therapy-refractory depression, and the severe and constant suicide efforts were the drivers for the interaction between the two. Palliative care is necessary for not only improving the quality of life of an individual but also the outcome of their treatment, personal centeredness, as well as the autonomy of the patient in making their personal decisions.

Mainly, 30% of the people receiving the palliative care services suffer from anxiety. Also, 38% of them have issues related to depression while 20-45% of the population suffer from other mental illnesses globally (Billings & Block, 2009). For that reason, over the last two decades, the collaboration between the two fields of psychiatry and palliative care has greatly increased in the developed countries. As outlined in the guidelines established by the Swiss Academy o