The purpose of this is to investigate a minimum of five current nursing research publications. Copies of 5 retrieved full-text publications (attached below) must be accurately cited on reference page and formatted in APA style. Work must be at least 3 pages. Template and grading rubric will be used to evaluate this work. 

References

1. Smith, J. D., Fu, E., & Kobayashi, M. A. (2020). Prevention and Management of Childhood Obesity and Its Psychological and Health Comorbidities. Annual review of clinical psychology, 16, 351–378. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-clinpsy-100219-060201

2. Ojeda-Rodríguez, A., Zazpe, I., Morell-Azanza, L., Chueca, M. J., Azcona-Sanjulian, M. C., & Marti, A. (2018). Improved Diet Quality and Nutrient Adequacy in Children and Adolescents with Abdominal Obesity after a Lifestyle Intervention. Nutrients, 10(10), 1500. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10101500

3. Kubik, M. Y., Fulkerson, J. A., Sirard, J. R., Garwick, A., Temple, J., Gurvich, O., Lee, J., & Dudovitz, B. (2018). School-based secondary prevention of overweight and obesity among 8- to 12-year old children: Design and sample characteristics of the SNAPSHOT trial. Contemporary clinical trials, 75, 9–18. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cct.2018.10.011

4. Seo, Y. G., Lim, H., Kim, Y., Ju, Y. S., Lee, H. J., Jang, H. B., Park, S. I., & Park, K. H. (2019). The Effect of a Multidisciplinary Lifestyle Intervention on Obesity Status, Body Composition, Physical Fitness, and Cardiometabolic Risk Markers in Children and Adolescents with Obesity. Nutrients, 11(1), 137. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11010137

5. Sánchez-Martínez, F., Brugueras, S., Serral, G., Valmayor, S., Juárez, O., López, M. J., Ariza, C., & Group, O. (2021). Three-Year Follow-Up of the POIBA Intervention on Childhood Obesity: A Quasi-Experimental Study. Nutrients, 13(2), 453. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020453

Prevention and Management of Childhood Obesity and its
Psychological and Health Comorbidities

Justin D. Smith, PhD1, Emily Fu, MPH2, Marissa Kobayashi, MHS3

1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Department of Preventive Medicine, and
Department of Pediatrics, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, 750 N.
Lake Shore Drive, Illinois, 60611, USA

2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Northwestern University Feinberg School of
Medicine, 750 N. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, Illinois, 60611, USA

3Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1120 NW
14th Street, Suite 1009, Miami, FL 33136. Phone: (305) 972-9961

Abstract

Childhood obesity has become a global pandemic in developed countries, leading to a host of

medical conditions that contribute to increased morbidity and premature death. The causes of

obesity in childhood and adolescence are complex and multifaceted, presenting researchers and

clinicians with myriad challenges in preventing and managing the problem. This chapter reviews

the state-of-the-science for understanding the etiology of childhood obesity, the preventive

interventions and treatment options for overweight and obesity, and the medical complications and

co-occurring psychological conditions that result from excess adiposity, such as hypertension,

non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and depression. Interventions across the developmental span,

varying risk levels, and service contexts (e.g., community, school, home, and healthcare systems)

are reviewed. Future directions for research are offered with an emphasis on translational issues

for taking evidence-based interventions to scale in a manner that reduce the public health burden

of the childhood obesity pandemic.

Keywords

adiposity; childhood obesity; health psychology; prevention; research translation

1.0 INTRODUCTION

Influenced by genetics, biology, psychosocial factors, and health behaviors, overweight and

obesity (OW/OB) in childhood is a complex public health problem affecting the majority of

developed countries worldwide. Additionally, the key contributors to obesity—poor diet and

physical inactivity—are among the leading causes of preventable youth deaths, chronic

[email protected].

DISCLOSURE STATEMENT
Justin D. Smith is co-developer of the Family Check-Up® 4 Health intervention for childhood obesity. The authors are not aware of
any other affiliations, memberships, funding, or financial holdings that might be perceived as affecting the objectivity of this review.

HHS Public Access
Auth

nutrients

Article

Improved Diet Quality and Nutrient Adequacy in
Children and Adolescents with Abdominal Obesity
after a Lifestyle Intervention

Ana Ojeda-Rodríguez 1,2, Itziar Zazpe 1,2,3,4,*, † , Lydia Morell-Azanza 1,2, María J. Chueca 2,5,
Maria Cristina Azcona-sanjulian 2,6 and Amelia Marti 1,2,4,*, †

1 Department of Nutrition, Food Sciences and Physiology, University of Navarra. C/ Irunlarrea, 1.
31008 Pamplona, Spain; aojeda[email protected] (A.O.-R.); [email protected] (L.M.-A.)

2 IdiSNA, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria de Navarra. C/Irunlarrea, 3. 31008 Pamplona, Spain;
[email protected] (M.J.C.); [email protected] (M.C.A.-S.)

3 Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine-Clínica Universidad de Navarra,
University of Navarra. C/ Irunlarrea, 1. 31008 Pamplona, Spain

4 Biomedical Research Centre Network on Obesity and Nutrition (CIBERobn), Physiopathology of Obesity
and Nutrition, Institute of Health Carlos III. Av. Monforte de Lemos, 3-5. 28029 Madrid, Spain

5 Paediatric Endocrinology Unit, Complejo Hospitalario de Navarra. C/Irunlarrea, 3. 31008 Pamplona, Spain
6 Paediatric Endocrinology Unit, Department of Paediatrics. Clínica Universidad de Navarra. Av. Pío XII, 36.

31008 Pamplona, Spain
* Correspondence: [email protected] (I.Z.); [email protected] (A.M.); Tel: +34-948-425600; Fax: + 34-948-425-649
† I.Z. and A.M. contributed equally to this work and are the corresponding authors.

Received: 13 September 2018; Accepted: 11 October 2018; Published: 13 October 2018
����������
�������

Abstract: High rates of childhood obesity require integral treatment with lifestyle modifications that
achieve weight loss. We evaluated a lifestyle intervention on nutrient adequacy and diet quality in
children and adolescents with abdominal obesity. A randomized controlled trial was performed on
107 participants, assigned either to a usual care group or to an intensive care group that followed
a moderate hypocaloric Mediterranean diet and received nutritional education. Intake adequacy
was evaluated using Dietary Reference Intakes and diet quality through the Diet Quality Index for
Adolescents (DQI-A), the Healthy

School-based secondary prevention of overweight and obesity
among 8- to 12-year old children: Design and sample
characteristics of the SNAPSHOT trial

Martha Y. Kubik, PhD, RN, Jayne A. Fulkerson, PhD, John R. Sirard, PhD, Ann Garwick,
PhD, RN, Judy Temple, PhD, Olga Gurvich, MA, Jiwoo Lee, PhD, RN, and Bonnie Dudovitz,
MEd
Temple University, College of Public Health, Department of Nursing, 3307 North Broad Street,
Philadelphia, PA 19103

Abstract

Rising levels of severe obesity among children, worsening disparities by race and ethnicity and

reluctance of primary care clinicians’ to provide obesity management to children are compelling

reasons to consider alternatives to primary care management of childhood obesity. The Students

Nurses and Parents Seeking Healthy Options Together (SNAPSHOT) trial will test the efficacy of

an elementary school-based, school nurse-led, healthy weight management program to reduce

excess weight gain among children, 8- to 12-years old with a body mass index (BMI) ≥75th

percentile, by increasing healthy dietary practices and physical activity and decreasing sedentary

behaviors. SNAPSHOT has enrolled and randomized 132 child/parent dyads to either the: 1) 9-

month SNAPSHOT intervention that includes four home visits, 14 kid groups held during outof-

school time and five parent groups or 2) a newsletter program consisting of monthly mailings and

family-focused healthy lifestyle information. Outcomes are assessed at baseline, 12-months (post

intervention) and 24-months (follow-up) post randomization. The primary outcome is child age-

and gender-adjusted BMI z-score. Secondary outcomes include child dietary intake assessed with

24-hour dietary recall interviews and accelerometer-measured activity levels. The SNAPSHOT

intervention is a model of secondary obesity prevention for children that addresses the urgent need

for theory-informed, evidence-based and safe weight management programs, delivered by skilled

health professionals in accessible settings. This report describes development of the SNAPSHOT

trial, including recruitment and randomization procedures, assessments, intervention and

implementation plans, and baseline characteristics of the study sample.

Keywords

secondary obesity prevention; childhood obesity; randomized controlled trial

Correspondence to: Martha Y. Kubik.

Publisher’s Disclaimer: This is a PDF file of an unedited manuscript that has been accepted for publication. As a service to our
customers we are providing this early version of the manuscript. The manuscript will undergo copyediting, typesetting, and review of
the resulting proof before it is published in its final citable form. Please note that during the production process errors may be

nutrients

Article

The Effect of a Multidisciplinary Lifestyle
Intervention on Obesity Status, Body Composition,
Physical Fitness, and Cardiometabolic Risk Markers
in Children and Adolescents with Obesity

Young-Gyun Seo 1 , Hyunjung Lim 2, YoonMyung Kim 3, Young-Su Ju 4 , Hye-Ja Lee 5,
Han Byul Jang 5, Sang Ick Park 5 and Kyung Hee Park 1,*

1 Department of Family Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang, Gyeonggi-do 14068,
Korea; [email protected]

2 Department of Medical Nutrition, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi-do 17104, Korea;
[email protected]

3 University College, Yonsei University International Campus, Incheon 21983, Korea; [email protected]
4 Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital,

Anyang, Gyeonggi-do 14068, Korea; [email protected]
5 Center for Biomedical Sciences, Korea National Institute of Health, Cheongju, Chungbuk 28159, Korea;

[email protected] (H.-J.L.); [email protected] (H.B.J.); [email protected] (S.I.P.)
* Correspondence: [email protected]; Tel.: +82-31-380-3805

Received: 12 November 2018; Accepted: 5 January 2019; Published: 10 January 2019
����������
�������

Abstract: This study aimed to develop a multidisciplinary lifestyle intervention program targeted
at children and adolescents with moderate to severe obesity, and assess the additional effects of
exercise intervention when compared to usual care. Overall, the 103 enrolled participants were
≥85th percentile of age and sex-specific body mass index (BMI). Participants were divided into
groups that received 16 weeks of either usual care or exercise intervention. The BMI z-score of
the overall completers decreased by about 0.05 after the 16-week intervention (p = 0.02). After the
intervention, only the exercise group had a significantly lower BMI z-score than the baseline score by
about 0.1 (p = 0.03), but no significant group by time interaction effects were observed. At

nutrients

Article

Three-Year Follow-Up of the POIBA Intervention on Childhood
Obesity: A Quasi-Experimental Study

Francesca Sánchez-Martínez 1,2,3,* , Silvia Brugueras 1, Gemma Serral 1,2,4 , Sara Valmayor 1, Olga Juárez 1 ,
María José López 1,2,3,4 , Carles Ariza 1,2,4 and on behalf of the POIBA Project Evaluation Group †

����������
�������

Citation: Sánchez-Martínez, F.;

Brugueras, S.; Serral, G.; Valmayor, S.;

Juárez, O.; López, M.J.; Ariza, C.;

Three-Year Follow-Up of the POIBA

Intervention on Childhood Obesity:

A Quasi-Experimental Study.

Nutrients 2021, 13, 453. https://

doi.org/10.3390/nu13020453

Academic Editor: Eva

Maria Navarrete-Munoz

Received: 12 December 2020

Accepted: 26 January 2021

Published: 29 January 2021

Publisher’s Note: MDPI stays neutral

with regard to jurisdictional claims in

published maps and institutional affil-

iations.

Copyright: © 2021 by the authors.

Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

This article is an open access article

distributed under the terms and

conditions of the Creative Commons

Attribution (CC BY) license (https://

creativecommons.org/licenses/by/

4.0/).

1 Agència de Salut Pública de Barcelona (Public Health Agency of Barcelona, ASPB), Pl Lesseps 1,
08023 Barcelona, Spain; [email protected] (S.B.); [email protected] (G.S.); [email protected] (S.V.);
[email protected] (O.J.); [email protected] (M.J.L.); [email protected] (C.A.)

2 Institut d’Investigació Biomèdica Sant Pau (IIIB Sant Pau), Sant Antoni Maria Claret 167,
08025 Barcelona, Spain

3 Pompeu Fabra University (UPF), Health and Experimental Science Department, Doctor Aiguader 80,
08003 Barcelona, Spain

4 Ciber de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Monforte de Lemos 3-5, 28029 Madrid, Spain
* Correspondence: [email protected]; Tel.: +34-93-202-77-17
† Membership of the POIBA Project Evaluation Group is provided in the Acknowledgments.

Abstract: Childhood o

Criteria Exemplary
A=15-13.95

Proficient
B=13.94-12.78

Developing
C=12.77-
11.55

Emerging
D=11.54-
10.35

Points
Awarded
and
Comments

Intro-
duction

Problem statement
and research
question clearly
defined. Problem
statement
supported well by
evidence.
Databases, and
concepts used for
search also
provided.

Problem
statement and
research question
clearly defined.
Problem
statement not
supported well by
evidence.
Databases, and
concepts used for
search also
provided.

Problem
statement and
research
question
stated but is
too vague or
unclear.

Fails to
identify the
problem
statement and
research
question.

Exemplary
A=40-37.2

Proficient
B=37.6-34

Developing
C=33.9-30.8

Emerging
D=30.4-27.6

Points
Awarded
and
Comments

Research
and Analysis

At least five (5)
scholarly sources
which are current
(within the last 5
years), relevant,
consistent, and
related to the topic
are cited, and the
findings are
summarized. There
is an analysis
(comparison/contras
t) of the articles.

At least five (5)
scholarly sources
which are current
(within the last 5
years), relevant,
consistent, and
related to the
topic are cited,
and the findings
are summarized.
There is limited
or no analysis
(comparison and
contrast) of the
articles.

Three (3)
scholarly
sources are
used. Not all
sources are
current (within
the last 5
years),
relevant,
consistent,
and related to
the topic.
There is
limited or no
analysis
(comparison
and contrast)
of the articles.

No scholarly
sources are
cited which
are current
(within the last
5 years),
relevant,
consistent,
and related to
the topic.
There is
limited or no
analysis
(comparison
and contrast)
of the articles.

Exemplary
A=15-13.95

Proficient
B=13.94-12.78

Developing
C=12.77-
11.55

Emerging
D=11.54-
10.35

Points
Awarded
and
Comments

Conclusion
and
Reflection

Thoroughly
summarizes what
was learned from
this assignment and
the topic. Includes if
new knowledge was
gained.

Clearly
summarizes what
was learned from
the assignment
and the topic.
Includes if new
knowledge was
gained.

Mostly
summarizes
what was
learned from
the
assignment
and the topic.
Does not
include
whether new

Minimal or lack
of summary on
topic.

knowledge
was gained.

Exemplary
A=20-18.6

Proficient
B=18.5-17

Developing
C=16 -15.4

Emerging
D=15.3-13.8

Points
Awarded
and
Comments

Writing Content is
expressed in third
person (except for
the reflection
section). The writing
is well organize

NUR3165 Literature Review QEP Assignment

The purpose of this assignment is to investigate a minimum of five current nursing research
publications on an approved research problem. The goal is to be able to differentiate research
from other types of publications, with a focus on qualitative and quantitative research. Your
professor will provide you with a rubric by which your work will be evaluated.

Introductory paragraph

Research: Summary of Findings

Analysis

Conclusion

Reflection

QEP Writing Assignment Requirements:

• Your paper must be APA 7th edition format. Use headings in your paper. Your
introduction needs no heading. The title (centered and bold) precedes your introduction.

• Double space your paper and use APA-approved fonts and sizes such Times New Roman
12-point or Arial 11-point font.

Introduce your problem statement and the research question you are exploring. What do you

set out to do in this paper? Give the reader a brief preview of your paper. The problem

statement should be supported well by evidence. The databases and concepts used for the

search should also be provided.

In this section you will summarize a minimum of five current articles which address your

research question. Summarize major findings of each article under each major heading. Cite

all your sources, using a minimal number of direct quotes.

This is the section where you analyze the articles. Critically synthesize these works in an

organized manner, pointing out their similarities and differences.

Summarize the most important points from your paper. Draw any final conclusions about the

topic.

In this section, you may now begin to write in first person (I, me, my). Address these

questions in this section in a narrative fashion:

• What did you learn from the assignment?

• How does this added information compare to your prior knowledge?

• How has this assignment helped you to become more of a critical thinker?

• What new research skills can you now apply?

• How will this assignment impact your practice in the future?

• Did you experience any “a-ha” moment(s) while researching about your topic?

• What new connections did you make from your class, textbook, research, and
experience?

• Proofread your paper and visit a writing tutor before submitting your paper to Turnitin.
• A minimum of five (5) nursing research articles must be used.

o At least one of the authors on each article must be a nurse.
o The articles should be within the last 5 years.
o Make sure to include in your reference page the URL of the articles, so your

professor can view the full text of the f