APA format with citations.

  No Plagiarism.

As part of the class on Health Policy and Politics, you are required to write a letter to their legislator. The letters to the legislator will be evaluated for content, form, and clarity.

This assignment will help the student become an active participant in the policy-making arena, which directly affects the nursing profession and our country at large. Included are suggestions for effective written communication to your legislator. The importance of letter writing should not be underestimated as it has been rated by Congress as the number one means of communicating with the legislator. Letters that are written to the legislator are usually reviewed by staff and the various view points are tabulated. Letters with significant opinions or information are directed to the legislator for individual consideration. It is important to note that form letters and post cards receive the least amount of attention from the legislator. Therefore, it is most appropriate to create a letter which is thoughtful and reflects an informed opinion. 

You (the student) are required to create a letter to the legislator in your home district related to a current senate/house bill. You will choose a current health care legislative issue and draft a well written letter to your legislator discussing your opinion regarding the bill. Search http://mlis.state.md.us/#bill to find a health care related bill of interest to you. Attach a brief summary of the bill along with your letter.

When writing your letter, always refer to the issue by its bill name and number. You can look up the name and address of your local legislator at http://mlis.state.md.us. The following page outlines is a list of specific do’s and don’ts that you should consider when writing to your legislator. See 

https://www.thoughtco.com/write-effective-letters-to-congress-3322301

Letter to the Legislator


Communicating With Your Legislator

As part of the class on Health Policy and Politics, students are required to write a letter to their legislator. The letters to the legislator will be evaluated for content, form, and clarity.

This assignment will help the student become an active participant in the policy-making arena, which directly affects the nursing profession and our country at large. Included are suggestions for effective written communication to your legislator. The importance of letter writing should not be underestimated as it has been rated by Congress as the number one means of communicating with the legislator. Letters that are written to the legislator are usually reviewed by staff and the various view points are tabulated. Letters with significant opinions or information are directed to the legislator for individual consideration. It is important to note that form letters and post cards receive the least amount of attention from the legislator. Therefore, it is most appropriate to create a letter which is thoughtful and reflects an informed opinion. 


You (the student) are required to create a letter to the legislator in your home district related to a current senate/house bill. You will choose a current health care legislative issue and draft a well written letter to your legislator discussing your opinion regarding the bill.
Search 
http://mlis.state.md.us/#

bill to find a health care related bill of interest to you. Attach a brief summary of the bill along with your letter.

When writing your letter, always refer to the issue by its bill name and number. You can look up the name and address of your local legislator
at http://mlis.state.md.us.
The following page outlines is a list of specific do’s and don’ts that you should consider when writing to your legislator.


Communicating With Your Legislator

As part of the class on Health Policy and Politics, students are required to write a letter to their legislator. The letters to the legislator will be evaluated for content, form, and clarity. Five points will be deducted each day the paper is late.

Grading Criteria

Informing the legislator about the constituents who are affected by the bill; suggest visits to programs in his or her area.

10 points

Clearly identify the bill, using title and number.

5 points

Addressing your letter to the appropriate legislator.

5 points

Identify yourself (occupation, hometown, member of organization, i.e. ASNA).


Points allocation: Communicating With Your Legislator

As part of the class on Health Policy and Politics, students are required to write a letter to their legislator. The letters to the legislator will be evaluated for content, form, and clarity. Five points will be deducted each day the paper is late.

Grading Criteria

Informing the legislator about the constituents who are affected by the bill; suggest visits to programs in his or her area.

10 points

Clearly identify the bill, using title and number.

5 points

Addressing your letter to the appropriate legislator.

5 points

Identify yourself (occupation, hometown, member of organization, i.e. ASNA).

5 points

Type the letter using correct grammar, punctuation, and spelling.

Be courteous, brief, and to the point.

10 points

Provide pertinent reasons for your stand. Be constructive, and provide expert knowledge when possible. Reasons were expressed in a clear and organized manner.

25 points

Show your legislator how the issue relates to his or her district.

25 points

Write letters at appropriate times, for example, when a bill is in committee request action that is appropriate for that stage in the legislative process.

5 points

Attach a brief summary of the bill along with your letter.

10 points

ask an expert

www.NursingMadeIncrediblyEasy.com January/February 2017 Nursing made Incredibly Easy! 55

Be a legislative advocate
By Lisa Lockhart, MHA, MSN, RN, NE-BC

Q: As nurses, when we feel
strongly about a practice issue,
should we consider lobbying?
A: The American Nurses Association
(ANA) believes that it’s our responsibility

as nursing professionals to be involved in

advocating for patient safety, care stan-

dards, and healthy work environments.

The ANA is a strong voice for America’s

nurses and is among the most powerful

lobbying groups in Washington, D.C. Not

alone in its fi ght for nursing quality and

safety, the ANA is joined and supported

by our professional organizations, state

boards of nursing, and advocacy groups.

These include the American Academy of

Nursing, the American Nurses Credential-

ing Center, and the American Nurses

Foundation.

Participating in your local, specialty,

or state organizations can help you give

voice to your concerns as an engaged pro-

fessional. You have the ability to build,

shape, and alter current laws, effectively

changing legislation by joining forces with

your peers. To simply complain about

staffi ng ratios, the Affordable Care Act,

and unhealthy work environments is just

that—complaining. But by being involved,

we have a large and potentially powerful

voice for safety and quality when you con-

sider that we’re 3.6 million strong!

Our power as an educated workforce

must be harnessed and used purposefully

to effect change. The Institute of Medicine

and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

understood this when they launched The

Future of Nursing report. This doesn’t

necessarily mean that you have to go to

Washington and lobby; it means advocating

at the organizational, state, or federal level.

Stay abreast of what’s going on in your

state and nationally, be an active participant

in professional organizations, vote for legis-

lators who share your healthcare policy and

regulation views, and join internal commit-

tees where nurses at your facility review

policies and procedures. You can make a

difference.

If you decide to give lobbying a try, here

are tips on how to lobby Congress from the

American Academy of Ambulatory Nursing:

“• keep it short and to the point

• don’t forget to say ‘thank you’

• get to know the legislator’s staff (It’s

frequently more productive to speak to

a staff member than the lawmakers

themselves.)

• tell the whole story by acknowledging

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