Scenario

Healthy Dynamics is a corporate wellness company that provides a broad range of wellness services for clients seeking to improve the health and wellbeing of their employees. One of the clients of Healthy Dynamics is not happy with their employee wellness program participation rates. Healthy Dynamics is not meeting the contract requirements of 60% engagement, resulting in lost revenue for the company and no return on investment (ROI) for the client. According to the contractual agreement, Healthy Dynamics must pay back the client $200,000,000 if the annual participation percentage is not met. Currently the client’s wellness program includes financial incentives for the employees if they complete the following wellness offerings (health assessment, biometric screening, and telephonic health coaching). The Healthy Dynamics CEO is now foreseeing a need to offer other healthcare services. The CEO has asked the Account Manager to create a business plan focused on increasing revenue and identifying risk that might negatively impact their continued relationship with the client. The Account Manager has tasked you, the Strategic Planning Manager, with preparing an internal memo to present to the CEO and to communicate to your internal team what you are envisioning as a desired future focus area to increase the bottom line for Healthy Dynamics and improve current and future client satisfaction rates.

Instructions

Develop an internal memorandum that includes:

  • A detailed description defining the differences between business planning and strategic planning in healthcare.
  • Identify a specific focus area in the healthcare industry that could increase revenue.
  • Create key questions that you will need to address in the development of your strategic plan for your focus area.

Create a workflow analysis flow chart that includes:

  • A list of healthcare leadership team members (e.g., CEO, Strategic Planning Manager, Account Manager, Marketing Manager, Project Manager, Financial Analyst, etc.,)
  • A comprehensive analysis of each team member’s roles and responsibilities in the development of the strategic plan.
  • Your assignment should include a title page, a reference page, and a minimum of three scholarly sources, two of which must be retrieved from the Rasmussen Library (See attached and choice 2 articles). 

Rubric:

-Detailed description defining the differences between business planning and strategic planning in healthcare in a well-written internal memorandum.

 -Clearly identified a specific focus area in the healthcare industry that could increase revenue in a well-written internal memorandum.

 -Created detailed questions needed to address the development of a strategic plan in a well-written internal memorandum.

 -Created a comprehensive list of healthcare leadership team members in the workflow analysis flow chart.

 -Created a comprehensive analysis of each team member’s roles and responsibilities in the development of the strategic plan.

 -Used and identified three or more credible sources in the memorandum.

 

https://doi.org/10.11613/BM.2019.020601 Biochem Med (Zagreb) 2019;29(2):020601

1

Abstract

The Balanced Scorecard (BSC) is a tool for strategic management that is used in many companies and organizations worldwide, both in the public
and private sector. With this purpose it has also been used in healthcare organizations and institutions but there are not many studies on the imple-
mentation of BSC methodology in the day-to-day clinical laboratory. This review shows the strategy for the development of a BSC, which includes
theoretical perspective objectives, as well as some indicators and goals with which the monitoring and quantitative measurement of the achieve-
ments of a strategic plan in a clinical laboratory can be done. Moreover, the results of the indicators allow the prioritization of the initiatives to be
implemented each year.
The methodology for the development of the proposed BSC includes the following steps: definition of theoretical objectives of each of the perspec-
tives most used in the management of a clinical laboratory (customers, financial, internal processes and learning) taking into account the vision and
the organizational model of the laboratory; creation of a strategic map of perspective objectives; definition of the relevant indicators to follow up on
the objectives in a quantitative manner and establishment of the goals. Whether or not the laboratory is a reference laboratory, in which specific and
infrequent analysis and health population programs are performed, is another fact to take into account. In this review a BSC for a reference clinical
laboratory of the Spanish public sector is shown.
Keywords: balanced scorecard; clinical laboratory; management; strategic plan

Received: November 21, 2018 Accepted: February 27, 2019

A balanced scorecard for assessing a strategic plan in a clinical laboratory

Luisa Alvarez*1, Anna Soler1, Leonor Guiñón1, Aurea Mira2

1Quality Unit, Biomedical Diagnostic Center, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, Spain
2Managing Director, Biomedical Diagnostic Center, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, Spain

*Corresponding author: [email protected]

Short review

Introduction

Many organizations still present the results ob-
tained from the application of a strategic plan as a
list of achievements reached, sometimes accom-
panied by budget compliance but without using
any other type of analysis, which includes the
study of the impact of their results on the whole.
In this regard, a tool that can be used to track and
obtain quantitative data of the degree of achieve-
ment of the strategic plan’s objectives is the Bal-
anced Scorecard (BSC). The BSC is one of the most
popular performance management tools, which
categorizes the quantifiable objectives of

Toward a New Strategic Public Health
Science for Policy, Practice, Impact,
and Health Equity
Rebecca Bunnell, PhD, MEd, Juliet Ryan, MPH, Charlotte Kent, PhD, and the CDC Office of Science and
CDC Excellence in Science Committee

See also Brownson, p. 1389.

The COVID-19 pandemic and its social and health impact have underscored the need for a new strategic

science agenda for public health. To optimize public health impact, high-quality strategic science addresses

scientific gaps that inform policy and guide practice.

At least 6 scientific gaps emerge from the US experience with COVID-19: health equity science, data science

and modernization, communication science, policy analysis and translation, scientific collaboration, and

climate science. Addressing these areas within a strategic public health science agenda will accelerate

achievement of public health goals.

Public health leadership and scientists have an unprecedented opportunity to use strategic science to

guide a new era of improved and equitable public health. (Am J Public Health. 2021;111(8):1489–1496.

https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2021.306355)

COVID-19 has exposed majorunmet needs in our nation’s public
health system related to workforce,

diagnostics, preparedness, health dis-

parities, information systems, and

response capacity. While there have

been numerous calls for creating and

sustaining a robust public health infra-

structure and for prioritizing science,

antiscience sentiments have also been

widespread. Without a thoughtful,

strategic approach to scientific

research; rigorous evaluation of pro-

grams; and development of evidence-

based public health policy and com-

munication strategies, the United

States will be underprepared again

when the next pandemic occurs.

Ensuring impactful science as the bed-

rock for decision-making will set a

sound foundation for the future, and

lessons from COVID-19 can provide

direction for a strategic approach to

public health science.1

Public health has a mandate to

reduce morbidity and mortality and

advance health equity at the popula-

tion level. Metrics and frameworks

used to rank the impact and value of

public health science vary, often

reflecting stakeholder perspectives.

They frequently include a focus on

tangible health benefits, concern about

return on investment, interest in spe-

cific diseases, or prioritization of bib-

liometrics and scientometrics.2,3 Ret-

rospective metrics alone are

insufficient to guide strategic science;

effective action requires a prospective

approach. We believe strategic science

Toward a New Strategic Public Health
Science for Policy, Practice, Impact,
and Health Equity
Rebecca Bunnell, PhD, MEd, Juliet Ryan, MPH, Charlotte Kent, PhD, and the CDC Office of Science and
CDC Excellence in Science Committee

See also Brownson, p. 1389.

The COVID-19 pandemic and its social and health impact have underscored the need for a new strategic

science agenda for public health. To optimize public health impact, high-quality strategic science addresses

scientific gaps that inform policy and guide practice.

At least 6 scientific gaps emerge from the US experience with COVID-19: health equity science, data science

and modernization, communication science, policy analysis and translation, scientific collaboration, and

climate science. Addressing these areas within a strategic public health science agenda will accelerate

achievement of public health goals.

Public health leadership and scientists have an unprecedented opportunity to use strategic science to

guide a new era of improved and equitable public health. (Am J Public Health. 2021;111(8):1489–1496.

https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2021.306355)

COVID-19 has exposed majorunmet needs in our nation’s public
health system related to workforce,

diagnostics, preparedness, health dis-

parities, information systems, and

response capacity. While there have

been numerous calls for creating and

sustaining a robust public health infra-

structure and for prioritizing science,

antiscience sentiments have also been

widespread. Without a thoughtful,

strategic approach to scientific

research; rigorous evaluation of pro-

grams; and development of evidence-

based public health policy and com-

munication strategies, the United

States will be underprepared again

when the next pandemic occurs.

Ensuring impactful science as the bed-

rock for decision-making will set a

sound foundation for the future, and

lessons from COVID-19 can provide

direction for a strategic approach to

public health science.1

Public health has a mandate to

reduce morbidity and mortality and

advance health equity at the popula-

tion level. Metrics and frameworks

used to rank the impact and value of

public health science vary, often

reflecting stakeholder perspectives.

They frequently include a focus on

tangible health benefits, concern about

return on investment, interest in spe-

cific diseases, or prioritization of bib-

liometrics and scientometrics.2,3 Ret-

rospective metrics alone are

insufficient to guide strategic science;

effective action requires a prospective

approach. We believe strategic science

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Original Article

Copyright © 2021 Tehran University of Medical Sciences.
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International license https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).

Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted, provided the original work is properly cited.

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The second strategic plan of medical ethics: a national report

*Corresponding Author

Bagher Larijani

Address: No. 10, Next to Shariati Hospital, Jalal

Al-Ahmad St., Chamran Hwy., Tehran, Iran.

Postal Code: 1411713136

Tel: (+98) 21 88 63 12 95 -7

Email: [email protected]

Received: 10 Jul 2021

Accepted: 25 Nov 2021

Published: 2 Dec 2021

Citation to this article:

Parsapour A, Shamsi Gooshki E, Malekafzali H,

Zahedi F, Larijani B. The second strategic plan

of medical ethics: a national report. J Med

Ethics Hist Med. 2021; 14: 17.

Alireza Parsapour1, Ehsan Shamsi Gooshki1, Hossein Malekafzali2, Farzaneh Zahedi3, Bagher Larijani4*

1.Assistant Professor, Medical Ethics and History of Medicine Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences,
Tehran, Iran.
2.P

Cuschieri et al. Health Res Policy Sys (2021) 19:43
https://doi.org/10.1186/s12961-020-00665-y

R E S E A R C H

Mapping the burden of diabetes in five small
countries in Europe and setting the agenda
for health policy and strategic action
Sarah Cuschieri1, Elena Pallari2* , Natasa Terzic3, Ala’a Alkerwi4 and Árún Kristín Sigurðardóttir5,6

Abstract
Background: Diabetes is a global epidemic affecting every country. Small countries, however, face distinctive chal-
lenges related to their health system governance and their ability to implement effective health systems’ reforms.
The aim of this research was to perform a comparative assessment of existing diabetes management practices at the
population level and explore governmental-related policy for Cyprus, Iceland, Luxembourg, Malta and Montenegro.
This is the first time that such an evidence-based review study has been performed in the field of diabetes. The overall
purpose was to set the agenda for health policy and inform strategic actions for small countries that can benefit from
dealing with the diabetes epidemic at a country level.

Methods: We collected data and synthesized the evidence on dealing with diabetes for each of the five small Euro-
pean countries according to the (1) epidemiology of diabetes and other related metabolic abnormalities, (2) burden
of diabetes status and (3) diabetes registers and national plans. We collected data by contacting Ministry representa-
tives and other bodies in each state, and by searching through publicly available information from the respective
Ministry of Health website on strategies and policies.

Results: Diabetes rates were highest in Cyprus and Malta. National diabetes registers are present in Cyprus and Mon-
tenegro, while national diabetes plans and diabetes-specific strategies have been established in Cyprus, Malta and
Montenegro. These three countries also offer a free holistic healthcare service to their diabetes population.

Conclusions: Multistakeholder, national diabetes plans and public health strategies are important means to provide
direction on diabetes management and health service provision at the population level. However, political support
is not always present, as seen for Iceland. The absence of evidence-based strategies, lack of funding for conducting
regular health examination surveys, omission of monitoring practices and capacity scarcity are among the greatest
challenges faced by small countries to effectively measure health outcomes. Nevertheless, we identified means of
how these can be overcome. For example, the creation of public interdisciplinary repositories enables easily accessi-
ble data that can be used for health policy and strategic planning. Health policy-makers, funders and practitioners can
consider the use of regular health examination surveys and other tools to effectively manage diabetes at the

RESEARCH Open Access

Application of machine learning models in
predicting length of stay among healthcare
workers in underserved communities in
South Africa
Sangiwe Moyo1,3* , Tuan Nguyen Doan1,2, Jessica Ann Yun3 and Ndumiso Tshuma3

Abstract

Background: Human resource planning in healthcare can employ machine learning to effectively predict length of
stay of recruited health workers who are stationed in rural areas. While prior studies have identified a number of
demographic factors related to general health practitioners’ decision to stay in public health practice, recruitment
agencies have no validated methods to predict how long these health workers will commit to their placement.
We aim to use machine learning methods to predict health professional’s length of practice in the rural public
healthcare sector based on their demographic information.

Methods: Recruitment and retention data from Africa Health Placements was used to develop machine-learning
models to predict health workers’ length of practice. A cross-validation technique was used to validate the models, and
to evaluate which model performs better, based on their respective aggregated error rates of prediction. Length
of stay was categorized into four groups for classification (less than 1 year, less than 2 years, less than 3 years, and
more than 3 years). R, a statistical computing language, was used to train three machine learning models and
apply 10-fold cross validation techniques in order to attain evaluative statistics.

Results: The three models attain almost identical results, with negligible difference in accuracy. The “best”-
performing model (Multinomial logistic classifier) achieved a 47.34% [SD 1.63] classification accuracy while the
decision tree model achieved an almost comparable 45.82% [SD 1.69]. The three models achieved an average
AUC of approximately 0.66 suggesting sufficient predictive signal at the four categorical variables selected.

Conclusions: Machine-learning models give us a demonstrably effective tool to predict the recruited health
workers’ length of practice. These models can be adapted in future studies to incorporate other information
beside demographic details such as information about placement location and income. Beyond the scope of
predicting length of practice, this modelling technique will also allow strategic planning and optimization of
public healthcare recruitment.

Keywords: Machine learning, Artificial intelligence, Health workers, Modeling, Staff retention

* Correspondence: [email protected]
1Africa Health Placements, Rosebank, Johannesburg, South Africa
3The Best Health Solutions, 107 Louis Botha Avenue, Orange Grove,
Norwood, P.O. Box 92666, Johannesburg, South Africa
Full list of author information is availa