The term “knowledge worker” was first coined by management consultant and author Peter Drucker in his book, The Landmarks of Tomorrow (1959). Drucker defined knowledge workers as high-level workers who apply theoretical and analytical knowledge, acquired through formal training, to develop products and services. Does this sound familiar?

Nurses are very much knowledge workers. What has changed since Drucker’s time are the ways that knowledge can be acquired. The volume of data that can now be generated and the tools used to access this data have evolved significantly in recent years and helped healthcare professionals (among many others) to assume the role of knowledge worker in new and powerful ways.

In this Assignment, you will consider the evolving role of the nurse leader and how this evolution has led nurse leaders to assume the role of knowledge worker. You will prepare a PowerPoint presentation with an infographic (graphic that visually represents information, data, or knowledge. Infographics are intended to present information quickly and clearly.) to educate others on the role of nurse as knowledge worker.

Reference: Drucker, P. (1959). The landmarks of tomorrow. New York, NY: HarperCollins Publishers.

To Prepare:

  • Review the concepts of informatics as presented in the Resources.
  • Reflect on the role of a nurse leader as a knowledge worker.
  • Consider how knowledge may be informed by data that is collected/accessed.

The Assignment:

  • Explain the concept of a knowledge worker.
  • Define and explain nursing informatics and highlight the role of a nurse leader as a knowledge worker.
  • Include one slide that visually represents the role of a nurse leader as knowledge worker.
  • Your PowerPoint should Include the hypothetical scenario you originally shared in the Discussion Forum. Include your examination of the data that you could use, how the data might be accessed/collected, and what knowledge might be derived from that data. Be sure to incorporate feedback received from your colleagues’ responses.

1

Healthcare

[Author]

[Institution]

“When I was working as an Intensive Care Unit Nurse Supervisor, one of my focus was to reduce the number of hospital acquired infections (HAIs). This is because in general knowledge and based on our observation, my unit was becoming the favorite breeding ground of opportunistic pathogens given that most of our patients are immunocompromised. Aside from noticing it, we’ve confirmed the matter through collaborating with the Infection Control Department and Informatics Department, we utilized the electronic health records (EHRs) to determine the prevalence rate of HAIs in our unit over a certain period of time (2 years), the type of HAIs that were common, and their causative factors. Turns out that from the knowledge that we derived from that data, the rate was somewhat alarming and that the common HAIs we had were Catheter- Associated Infection, Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia, Central Line Associated Bloodstream Infection, and a few others more caused by microorganisms such as A.Bau, C.Diff, MRSA, Klebsiella, and more (Glassman, 2017).

Using my clinical judgment and reasoning as the nurse leader (supervisor), I utilized this knowledge to initiate an extensive form of research (with partnership with stakeholders such as the Infection Control Department and Infectious Disease Specialists in our hospitals) so as to prevent HAIs in our unit. I performed review of evidence-based researches, bench-marking (from best practices of local and international hospitals), eliciting expert opinions, and more to address and solve this problem. As a result, an action plan was formulated and incorporated in our policy such as additional assessment and documentation for monitoring of the potential development of HAIs (e.g. changing the contraptions on a certain prescribed time), antibiotic stewardship, strict aseptic measures, proper cohorting of patients, active screening, firm surveillance approaches (with the ICD), continuous educational updates regarding infection control, and changes on the regulations regarding the staff members’ attire (e.g. physician’s coat should be hung outside the unit, nurses should change uniforms when entering the premises, and other healthcare workers should wear appropriate PPEs to prevent cross contamination from other patients they have visited). As a result, the incidences of HAIs in our unit became significantly lower within a year and was apparent prior the advent of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Data is highly relevant in nursing practice because it reflects the current healthcare outcomes. Informatics also plays an important role because it allows easier access of these data. This becomes the nurses’ and the nurse

1

Healthcare

[Author]

[Institution]

“When I was working as an Intensive Care Unit Nurse Supervisor, one of my focus was to reduce the number of hospital acquired infections (HAIs). This is because in general knowledge and based on our observation, my unit was becoming the favorite breeding ground of opportunistic pathogens given that most of our patients are immunocompromised. Aside from noticing it, we’ve confirmed the matter through collaborating with the Infection Control Department and Informatics Department, we utilized the electronic health records (EHRs) to determine the prevalence rate of HAIs in our unit over a certain period of time (2 years), the type of HAIs that were common, and their causative factors. Turns out that from the knowledge that we derived from that data, the rate was somewhat alarming and that the common HAIs we had were Catheter- Associated Infection, Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia, Central Line Associated Bloodstream Infection, and a few others more caused by microorganisms such as A.Bau, C.Diff, MRSA, Klebsiella, and more (Glassman, 2017).

Using my clinical judgment and reasoning as the nurse leader (supervisor), I utilized this knowledge to initiate an extensive form of research (with partnership with stakeholders such as the Infection Control Department and Infectious Disease Specialists in our hospitals) so as to prevent HAIs in our unit. I performed review of evidence-based researches, bench-marking (from best practices of local and international hospitals), eliciting expert opinions, and more to address and solve this problem. As a result, an action plan was formulated and incorporated in our policy such as additional assessment and documentation for monitoring of the potential development of HAIs (e.g. changing the contraptions on a certain prescribed time), antibiotic stewardship, strict aseptic measures, proper cohorting of patients, active screening, firm surveillance approaches (with the ICD), continuous educational updates regarding infection control, and changes on the regulations regarding the staff members’ attire (e.g. physician’s coat should be hung outside the unit, nurses should change uniforms when entering the premises, and other healthcare workers should wear appropriate PPEs to prevent cross contamination from other patients they have visited). As a result, the incidences of HAIs in our unit became significantly lower within a year and was apparent prior the advent of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Data is highly relevant in nursing practice because it reflects the current healthcare outcomes. Informatics also plays an important role because it allows easier access of these data. This becomes the nurses’ and the nurse