our readings and discussions have been focused on establishing a baseline for understanding diversity. In this module, we’ll begin our tour through the four lenses, beginning with history. As we dive into the four lenses, keep in mind that each lens is framed as a way of seeing the issue and is not necessarily tied to the associated discipline. So, looking through the historical lens isn’t just about History Channel documentaries—it’s also about how you use the lens to understand the past and present. As you write your initial post, answer the following questions:

  • In what ways does looking through the history lens enhance your understanding of diversity?
  • Consider a current event in the news that has a historical counterpart. How does looking through the history lens influence how you perceive both the current and historical events? Please share a news link to your events.
  • How does analyzing the relationship between history, culture, and diversity have an influence on your discipline of study or chosen profession?

Make sure you support your response with the readings from this module, and any additional resources if needed.

Rutgers University Press

Chapter Title: Introduction

Book Title: Challenges of Diversity
Book Subtitle: Essays on America
Book Author(s): WERNER SOLLORS
Published by: Rutgers University Press. (2017)
Stable URL: https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt1v2xtjj.3

JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide

range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and

facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact [email protected].

Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at

Terms and Conditions of Use

Rutgers University Press is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access
to Challenges of Diversity

This content downloaded from 198.246.186.26 on Mon, 15 Jul 2019 21:57:49 UTC
All use subject to https://about.jstor.org/terms

3

Introduction

Ah me, what are the people whose land I
have come to this time,
and are they violent and savage, and
without justice,
or hospitable to strangers, with a godly
mind?
—Homer, Odyssey VI:119–1211

Migration has been a human experience since the earliest times, and epic
stories of migrants have accompanied this experience. In the biblical book
of Genesis, Adam and Eve are expelled from the Garden of Eden, and the
three monotheistic religions have drawn on the story of paradise as an ideal
place of origin that man forfeited because of his fallibility. Noah and his
family are saved from the environmental disaster of the flood and can start
a new life elsewhere. In the book of Exodus, Moses and the Israelites escape
from oppressive slavery in Eg ypt. In Vergil’s Aeneid the defeated Trojans
leave their city in search of a new country. Such great stories have provided
vivid and often heartrending scenes that writers, painters, and composers
have returned to. They include scenes of departures, as when Aeneas car-
ries his father Anchises out of the burning city and brings his son and the
Penates along but loses his wife; of difficult journeys, as when the Israelites

This content downloaded from 198.246.186.26 on Mon, 15 Jul 2019 21:57:49 UTC
All use subject to https://about.jstor.org/terms

4 • Werner Sollors

follow a pillar of fire at night and of cloud in the day and miraculously cross
the Red Sea to reach the Promised Land; and of arrivals, as when Noah’s
ark lands on Mount Ararat after the dove he sent out returns with an olive
leaf in her beak. Such epic stories tell tales of the hospitality that Nausikaa
ext

Russell Sage Foundation

Chapter Title: Introduction: Immigration and the Color Line in America

Book Title: Diversity Paradox, The
Book Subtitle: Immigration and the Color Line in Twenty-First Century America
Book Author(s): Jennifer Lee and Frank D. Bean
Published by: Russell Sage Foundation. (2010)
Stable URL: https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7758/9781610446617.5

JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide

range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and

facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact [email protected].

Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at

Terms and Conditions of Use

Russell Sage Foundation is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to
Diversity Paradox, The

This content downloaded from 198.246.186.26 on Mon, 15 Jul 2019 21:55:17 UTC
All use subject to https://about.jstor.org/terms

~ PART I ~

Historical Background,
Theoretical Framework,

and Sociodemographic Context

12008-01_PT1-CH01-rev2.qxd 4/19/10 3:23 PM Page 1

This content downloaded from 198.246.186.26 on Mon, 15 Jul 2019 21:55:17 UTC
All use subject to https://about.jstor.org/terms

12008-01_PT1-CH01-rev2.qxd 4/19/10 3:23 PM Page 2

This content downloaded from 198.246.186.26 on Mon, 15 Jul 2019 21:55:17 UTC
All use subject to https://about.jstor.org/terms

~ Chapter 1 ~

Introduction: Immigration
and the Color Line in America

On November 4, 2008, the United States elected Barack Obama president,
elevating an African American to the country’s highest office for the first time.
Because Obama’s rise illustrates how far the United States has come from the
days when blacks were denied the right to vote, when schools and water foun-
tains were segregated, when it was illegal for blacks and whites to marry, and
when racial classification was reduced to an absolutist dichotomy of black and
white, it is fitting to ask: Does Barack Obama’s election signify substantial ero-
sion in the country’s long-standing black-white color line? Many scholars and
pundits assert that his victory indicates that the country has finally moved
beyond race and that the color line long dividing blacks and whites has largely
disappeared. For example, Abigail and Stephan Thernstrom, in an op-ed piece
titled “Is Race Out of the Race?” (Los Angeles Times, March 2, 2008), argued that
Obama’s enormous appeal among white voters ref

IDS 400 The Four General Education Lenses

Each time we approach a question or project, we are informed by certain perspectives, or “lenses.” At
any given time, we are looking through multiple lenses, but often, one may be more dominant than the
others. Throughout your academic journey, these lenses coincide with disciplines or fields of study. Here
at SNHU, we’ve prioritized four of these lenses: the Humanities, History, the Sciences, and the Social
Sciences. Professionals in these fields all ask questions in order to gain information, but they may ask
them in different ways that will help them examine different aspects of a topic. We can think of these as
four different telescopes, and each lens has different characteristics. Thus, depending on the lens we are
looking through, the cultural artifacts we encounter—the constructed items that convey the
benchmarks of a particular culture or social group—will tell a different story.

The Humanities
At the core of the humanities is human creativity, and they explore the things that humanity creates and
how they offer insight into the way people experienced their present, interacted with their culture, and
comprehended abstract concepts and big questions about humanity’s place in the universe. The
humanities broaden perspectives and promote an understanding of multiple experiences, cultures, and
values through various mediums of creative human expression—such as literature, fine art, dance,
photography, philosophy and religion, film and television, music, even the internet and social media—
many of which are taught as separate academic disciplines. Within the humanities, both the artist’s (or
creator’s) intent and audience reception of a creative artifact are considered to help understand cultural
values and why they matter. They celebrate cultural diversity while also highlighting cultural similarity.
View these brief videos for more on the lens of the humanities: What Are the Humanities and Why Are
They Important? (1:53); IDS-100: Humanities (3:22).

History
Many of us are familiar with history as being a list of dates, events, and people to memorize, but history
is so much more than simply dates and memorizing facts. Your primary exposure to history could have
been in grade school required classes or in documentaries about subjects you find interesting. There is
so much more to history, however. History tells the stories of our past to help us better understand how
we got to the present. In addition to dates, events, and people, history encompasses first-hand accounts
of experiences that include artifacts from an era (tools, clothes, toys, etc.), letters or diaries from people
who lived during a certain time, documents from a time period, photographs, and, when possible,
interviews with people who lived through the events that historians study. Together, these historical
remnants help write a story of a par